Males, Females, and Behavior: Toward Biological Understanding

By Lee Ellis; Linda Ebertz | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Effects of Perinatal and Puberal Steroid Imprinting on Sexual Behavior of Adult Rats

György Csaba

The maturation of hormone receptors runs parallel with the differentiation of the cell ( Hubbert & Miller, 1974). For instance, binding capacity of insulin receptors in rat liver is low during the fetal period and gradually increases as the fetus approaches the time of birth ( Margolis, Tanner, Seminara, & Taylor, 1990). Despite existing variations, receptor maturation is usually completed by the end of the first postnatal month ( Blazquez, Rubalcava, Montesano, Orci, & Unger, 1976).

The maturation process is not spontaneous, as the first encounter of the receptor with the hormone in the perinatal critical period plays a decisive role. Without the presence of the appropriate hormone, the receptor is not able to accomplish its normal maturation and the resultant unmatured receptor is unable to transmit the information and have the cell evoke its normal response ( Csaba & Nagy, 1985). Subsequently, the first encounter with the hormone leads to "hormonal imprinting," after which the binding capacity of receptors -- mainly their density -- increases, and consequently the magnitude of the cell's reaction is enhanced (Csaba, 1980; 1981; 1984; 1986; 1994). This means that hormonal imprinting is a necessity for receptor development, as the cell is waiting for the first encounter with the hormone (see Figure 4. 1). Hormonal imprinting has an evolutionary basis and its importance in the phylogeny of receptors is worth noting ( Csaba, 1985; 1994). In fact, the ontogenetic development of the receptors is a repetition of this evolutionary event, with a metazoan -- physiological significance.

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Males, Females, and Behavior: Toward Biological Understanding
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.