Males, Females, and Behavior: Toward Biological Understanding

By Lee Ellis; Linda Ebertz | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
The Involvement of Neonatal 5HT Receptor-Mediated Effects on Sexual Dimorphism of Adult Behavior in the Rat

Catherine A. Wilson, M. Isabel Gonzalez, M. Emmanuella Albonetti, and Francesca Farabollini

The brain is sexually dimorphic and this leads to the sexual differences in centrally controlled physiological functions and behaviors ( MacLusky & Naftolin, 1981). This differentiation of the brain is under the control of testosterone secreted by the fetal/neonatal testicles over a critical period which, in the rat, extends over the last days in utero and the first two weeks postpartum ( MacLusky & Naftolin, 1981; Wilson, George, & Griffin, 1981). In the presence of androgens, the brain is masculinized and, compared to the female, some brain areas develop differently in size, neuronal population, synaptic connections, and neurotransmitter concentrations and activity ( Breedlove, 1994; de Vries, 1990). It seems likely that the steroid-induced differences in neurotransmitter activity occurring early in life are the links between the neonatal hormone and the sex differences in adulthood.

Among the various transmitters, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5HT) is an important candidate for causing sexual differences in brain functioning and behavior ( Jacobs & Azmitia, 1992). 5HT, like the androgens, has organizational effects over the neonatal period and can promote the development of its own system ( Whitaker-Azmitia & Azmitia, 1986) as well as stimulate the growth and differentiation of other neuronal systems ( Lauder, 1990; Whitaker- Azmitia , 1992). The actions of 5HT are mediated by at least seven receptor subtypes (5HT-1, 5HT-2, etc.), with further divisions within each subtype; so far, for instance, 5HT-1 receptors are further classified as 5HT-1A, -1B, up to -1F ( Watson & Girdlestone, 1995). Both 5HT-1A and 5HT-2 receptors in

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Males, Females, and Behavior: Toward Biological Understanding
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.