American Labor in the Era of World War II

By Sally M. Miller; Daniel A. Cornford | Go to book overview

equality. Eventually, the CIO succeeded in implementing a campaign of racial unity on behalf of the war effort.

This collection of almost one dozen chapters does not pretend to offer a last word on the topic of labor and World War II. In such a rich and dynamic field, it seeks to promote the discussion further.


NOTES
1.
Editors' introduction to "American Labor in the 1940s," Radical America 9 ( July-August 1975): 4.
2.
Among the most valuable works that deal with some of the major aspects of the social history of this period are William O'Neill, A Democracy at War: America's Fight at Home and Abroad in World War II ( New York: Free Press, 1993); James N. Gregory , American Exodus: The Dust Bowl Migration and Okie Culture ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1989); James Grossman, Land of Hope: Chicago, Black Southerners and the Great Migration ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989); Carole Marks, Farewell We're Good and Gone: The Great Black Migration ( Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1989); Joe Trotter, Black Milwaukee: The Making of an Industrial Proletariat, 1915-1945 ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1985); D'Ann Campbell, Women at War with America: Private Lives in a Patriotic Era ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984); Miriam Frank, Marilyn Ziebarth, and Connie Field, The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter: The Story of Three Million Working Women During World War II ( Emeryville, Calif.: Clarity Educational Productions, 1982); Karen Anderson, Wartime Women, Sex Roles, Family Relations, and the Status of Women During World War II ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1981); Susan M. Hartman, The Home Front and Beyond: American Women in the 1940s ( Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1982); Amy Kesselman, Fleeting Opportunities: Women Shipyard Workers in Portland and Vancouver During World War II ( Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990).
3.
Marilynn S. Johnson, The Second Gold Rush: Oakland and the East Bay in World War II ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993), p. 2.
4.
Mike Davis, Prisoners of the American Dream ( London: Verso, 1986), p. 75.
5.
Important recent work on African Americans and the labor movement during World War II include Robert Korstad and Nelson Lichtenstein, "Opportunities Lost and Found: Labor, Radicals, and the Early Civil Rights Movement," Journal of American History 75 ( December 1988): 786-811; Michael K. Honey, Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights: Organizing Memphis Workers ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993); Bruce Nelson, "Organized Labor and the Struggle for Black Equality in Mobile During World War II," Journal of American History 80 ( December 1993): 952-88; and a special issue of International Labor and Working-Class History (Volume 44, Fall 1993) with a symposium on "Race and the CIO: The Possibilities for Racial Egalitarianism During the 1930s and 1940s."
6.
These statistics are taken from several general surveys of labor in this period, including Davis, Prisoners of the American Dream; Robert H. Zieger, American Workers, American Unions, 1920- 1985 ( Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986); and American Social History Project, Who Built America? Working

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