Economic History of the United States

By Chester W. Wright | Go to book overview

EDITOR'S FOREWORD

IN "Economic History of the United States," Professor Wright presents in a single volume a comprehensive and definitive treatment of the development of our national economic life. It is based upon careful and exhaustive research and has been tested for many years in classroom presentation at the University of Chicago.

Professor Wright traces the economic progress and achievements of the nation from the background and environment of the colonial period, in which it had its birth, through the period of reconstruction following the first World War. As would be expected, while he adequately treats the earlier economic history of the nation, he devotes his major attention to developments since the Civil War. His treatment provides an excellent chronological perspective of the main events affecting our national life from its foundation through 1940. He likewise gives a penetrating analysis of some of our broader social and economic problems, such as transportation and communication; agriculture and other extractive industries; manufacturing; labor; domestic and foreign commerce; money, banking, and financial institutions; the government and economic life; and the national standard of living. Of particular interest are his careful analysis of the depression of 1929 and his objective evaluation of the experimentation of the New Deal in the period from 1933 to 1940. The author has brought to bear upon his materials the critical eye of a careful historian and a sound economist.

Needless to say, Professor Wright's treatise is indispensable to instructors engaged in the teaching of economics in colleges and universities. It is equally important to those engaged in the teaching of history. Schools of business, which have not placed the emphasis they should have upon the development of our national economic life, will find in this treatise a careful analysis of major movements affecting private business and the development of business institutions.

Business executives who are anxious--and rightly so--concerning the future of private business will find here an excellent basis for understanding and evaluating present-day trends in the changing relation between government and economic life.

"Economic History of the United States" is a volume in the series of Business and Economics Publications, which is sponsored by the University of Chicago Press and the McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., in cooperation. The fact that there are many other series in this field of study calls for a brief word of explanation.

-xxvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic History of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1122

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.