Economic History of the United States

By Chester W. Wright | Go to book overview

PART I
THE COLONIAL PERIOD

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION: THE CHARACTER AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ECONOMIC HISTORY

The Nature of Economic History. At the beginning of our study it is important to get clearly in mind an understanding of the general character of economic history and the purposes that may be served by the study of that subject. Only thus can we judge of the relative significance of the large mass of facts presented or appreciate the broader and most vital aspects of the problems with which we are dealing. . Economics or political economy has been defined as the science dealing with the activities of man in the processes of producing, distributing, and consuming economic goods or wealth, or more briefly the process of getting a living. Since getting a living is the primary objective of the business world, economics is sometimes called "the science of business." As it deals with the activities of men both individually and collectively, it is a social science as distinguished from a natural science. The economic history of the United States, therefore, deals with the methods and processes by which the people of this country have endeavored during the different stages of the country's development to supply their economic wants or get a living. Since the people of the country both as individuals and through group or national action have generally sought to devise better or more economical ways and means for getting a living, there has been a constant change in the methods and devices used. Thus an evolutionary social process is discernible and our study becomes a history of the evolution of industrial society in the United States.

To obtain a clearer idea of the nature of this study it is essential to understand the fundamental conditions underlying industrial society and the necessity for getting a living. These all go back to the fact that nature--our physical environment--does not freely supply enough things to satisfy man's wants. There is a lack of harmony between our wants and our physical environment. "In the sweat of thy brow shalt

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic History of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1122

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.