Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Economic History of the United States

By Chester W. Wright | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXII
LABOR CONDITIONS AND THE LABOR MOVEMENT, 1815-1860

Introduction. The opening up of the West combined with the rapid economic development of the country in general was such that, in spite of the great natural increase of population and the influx of immigrants, labor continued to be scarce as compared with the conditions in Europe and the economic position of the laborer was relatively favorable. However, the developments that were taking place in the general economic organization of the country and the growing importance of certain branches of industry such as mining and manufacturing were tending to bring about marked changes in the conditions affecting labor. Thus the increasing specialization and division of labor, combined with the growing scale of production, were tending to develop a group of hired workers who remained such throughout their life--in short, a distinct laboring class such as scarcely existed in colonial times outside of the group of slaves.

At the same time the development of mining and railroad transportation and the transfer of many industries from the household or the shop to the factory greatly altered the conditions under which the laborer worked. Also, the increased mobility of labor and the products of labor intensified the competition both among laborers and among the employers of labor, and so reacted upon the worker. Finally, all these developments led to efforts among the workers to organize themselves for the purpose of improving their condition and so gave rise to the beginning of the modern labor movement. These and other closely related developments made this period in the history of American labor significant as initiating changes in the condition and position of the laborer which in time created new problems of the most momentous character.

The Supply of Labor. The chief factors that determine the labor supply of a country were mentioned in Chap. VII. Among these was named the number of inhabitants of the country capable of doing work. The previous account of the rapid growth of population will suffice to indicate the increased labor supply thus made available during this period.

The general willingness of the people to work (excluding the slaves, a group which, having been previously described, will not be considered in

-402-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic History of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1122

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.