Economic History of the United States

By Chester W. Wright | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXX
TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION SINCE 1860

Introduction. The outstanding feature in the history of transportation after 1860 was the dominant position attained by the railroads. The period during which the more widespread among the revolutionary effects following the introduction of railroads in this country were most felt may be said to fall roughly between the years 1850 and 1885. Until about 1850, or perhaps as late as 1860, the railroads were mainly feeders to the waterways. It was not until the fifties that anything like a real railroad system extended beyond the states bordering on the Atlantic coast. Between 1860 and . 1885 the transcontinental lines were pushed through to the Pacific coast, the main outlines of the country's railroad net were completed, the introduction of many technological improvements facilitated through traffic and lowered costs, short roads were consolidated into great systems, and a rapid reduction in rates took place. Though progress did not stop with 1885 its effects thereafter were much less revolutionary in character. With this advance in rail transportation came a decline in the importance of most of the inland waterways. In the twentieth century came the rapid spread of motor vehicles and extensive improvement and construction of roads to facilitate their use. Though primarily used for local or regional transport, this new vehicle was able to compete in many services with the railroads. More recently the airplane has provided the speediest transport known.

The period after 1860 also brought marked changes in the development of communication facilities; the most remarkable, such as the telephone, the wireless, and the radio, came in the latter portion of the period. Together, the improvements in transportation and communication have served to widen markets, promote specialization, stimulate trade, and build up a national economy. Moreover, as these improvements were adopted by other nations, the resulting gains were spread around the earth and promoted a more nearly world-wide economy. By 1938, man had encircled the globe in less than four days by airplane, a telegram had been sent around in less than five minutes, and a radio broadcast covering most of the world was possible.

Technological Advance in Railroads. The introduction of cheap steel brought many changes in the railroads, notable among them being the

-583-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic History of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1122

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.