Opening America's Market: U. S. Foreign Trade Policy since 1776

By Alfred E. Eckes Jr. | Go to book overview

Notes

ABBREVIATIONS
BC Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce
BEA Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce
BOB Bureau of the Budget
BT Board of Trade
CEA U.S. Council of Economic Advisers
CITIP U.S. Commission on International Trade and Investment Policy
CRI Committee for Reciprocity Information
DDCDeclassified Documents Catalog
DDE Dwight D. Eisenhower Library, Abilene, Kans.
FDR Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, N.Y.
FO Foreign Office
FRUS U.S. Department of State, Foreign Relations of the United States
GRF Gerald R. Ford Library, Ann Arbor, Mich.
HCH Herbert C. Hoover Library, West Branch, Iowa
HRAC U.S. House of Representatives, Appropriations Committee
HRE&L U.S. House of Representatives, Education and Labor Committee
HRW&M U.S. House of Representatives, Ways and Means Committee
HST Harry S. Truman Library, Independence, Mo.
ITC U.S. International Trade Commission ( 1975-)
ITF International Trade Files, Department of State, Record Group 43, National
Archives
JC Jimmy Carter Library, Atlanta, Ga.
JEC Joint Economic Committee, U.S. Congress
JFK John E. Kennedy Library, Boston, Mass.
LBJ Lyndon B. Johnson Library, Austin, Tex.
MD Morgenthau Diaries, Henry Morgenthau Papers, Franklin D. Roosevelt
Library, Hyde Park, N.Y.
MD/LC Manuscript Division, Library of Congress
NA National Archives, Washington, D.C.
NAC National Archives of Canada, Ottawa
NFTC National Foreign Trade Council
NSF National Security File
OF Official File
OTA Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress
OTAP U.S. Tariff Commission, Operation of the Trade Agreements Program
PHF President's Handwriting File
PPF President's Personal File
PRO Public Record Office, Kew, England
Randall U.S. Commission on Foreign Economic Policy, Clarence B. Randall, chairman
RG Record Group
RMN Richard M. Nixon Collection, National Archives, College Park, Md.
SHC Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

-291-

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Opening America's Market: U. S. Foreign Trade Policy since 1776
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Free Trade and Economic Security, 1776-1860 1
  • 2 - Protection and Prosperity? 28
  • 3 - Unreciprocal Trade 59
  • 4 - Infamous Smoot-Hawley 100
  • 5 - Cordell Hull's Tariff Revolution 140
  • 6 - Opening America's Market, 1960-1974 178
  • 7 - Illusive Safeguards 219
  • 8 - Curbing Executive Discretion in Unfair Trade Cases 257
  • Epilogue 278
  • Notes 291
  • Bibliography 349
  • Index 383
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