A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings

By Dylan Thomas; Daniel Jones | Go to book overview

Conversation about Christmas

Small Boy. Years and years and years ago, when you were a boy-----

Self. When there were wolves in Wales, and birds the colour of red-flannel petticoats whisked past the harp-shaped hills, when we sang and wallowed all night and day in caves that smelt like Sunday afternoons in damp front farmhouse parlours, and chased, with the jawbones of deacons, the English and the bears-----

Small Boy. You are not so old as Mr Beynon Number Twenty-Two who can remember when there were no motors. Years and years ago, when you were a boy-----

Self. Oh, before the motor even, before the wheel, before the duchess-faced horse, when we rode the daft and happy hills bare-back-----

Small Boy. You're not so daft as Mrs Griffiths up the street, who says she puts her ear under the water in the reservoir and listens to the fish talk Welsh. When you were a boy, what was Christmas like?

Self. It snowed.

Small Boy. It snowed last year, too. I made a snowman and my brother knocked it down and I knocked my brother down and then we had tea.

Self. But that was not the same snow. Our snow was not only shaken in whitewash buckets down the sky, I think it came shawling out of the ground and swam and drifted out of the arms and hands and bodies of the trees; snow grew overnight on the roofs of the houses like a pure and grandfather moss, minutely ivied the walls, and settled on the postman,

-97-

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A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher's Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Part I 1
  • A Prospect of the Sea 3
  • The Lemon 13
  • After the Fair 20
  • The Visitor 25
  • The Enemies 35
  • The Tree 42
  • The Map of Love 51
  • The Mouse and the Woman 58
  • The Dress 78
  • The Orchards 82
  • In the Direction of the Beginning 92
  • Part II 95
  • Conversation About Christmas 97
  • How to Be a Poet 104
  • The Followers 116
  • A Story 127
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