CHAPTER III
THE FIGHT FOR NORTH AMERICA

ON the threshold of her colonizing era in North America France possessed pre-eminent advantages in material power and governing capacity. Both in national wealth and population she was ahead of England, and had it not been for civil war her supremacy on the continent would have emerged far earlier.

Although France remained in many respects a feudal state, with rigid lines of caste separating class from class, her civilization was more distinctive than that of Spain or England, subtler, richer, more variegated than that of any other European state, and the intellectual content of this culture was mingled with a humanism that infected all the arts and sciences. With little affection for free institutions, but with a sympathetic and imaginative understanding of other races, including the primitive, she had the ability to share her native heritage with other lands. Macaulay's lofty pronouncement on the France of Louis XIV bears repetition. "She had forced the Castilian pride to yield her the precedence. She had summoned Italian princes to prostrate themselves at her footstool. Her authority was supreme on all matters of breeding from a duel to a minuet. She determined how a gentleman's coat must be cut, how long his peruke must be, whether his heels must be high or low, and whether the lace on his hat be broad or narrow."

None the less, with organized resources greater than those of Spain or England, and with a civilization more humane and adaptable, France was to suffer repeated set-backs, and eventually decisive defeat in the ensuing struggle for empire. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, only isolated areas in the world belonged to her--St. Pierre and Miquelon, Guiana, Cayenne, Mauritius and a few West Indian islands. To Frenchmen of this day it still appears as an astounding and in many ways undeserved reversal of fortune, and one of the first questions

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Canada: A Short History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 190

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.