Changing the World: A Framework for the Study of Creativity

By David Henry Feldman; Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi et al. | Go to book overview

8
Conclusion: Creativity Research on the Verge

Having presented our joint general perspective on the topic of creativity, and having placed before the reader some of our own most recent work, we now pause to reflect for a moment on what the prospects for the future of work on creativity look like at the moment. If it is "on the verge" of something, as the title of this conclusion suggests, what might that something be? Is the field positioned to take (or retake) its place among the major lines of thinking and research to occupy the social science community over the next several decades? Or will the traditional intractability and inscrutability of creativity (an imperviousness to explanation that has persisted for more than two millennia), render it likely that once again its central meaning will elude us, in spite of the confident claims of the artificial intelligence community that creativity is nothing more than a set of common mechanisms carrying out an uncommon set of activities.

Our view is that the cognitive science community is probably overly optimistic in its claims that creativity is in principle no more difficult to understand than any other process of the human nervous system, and that it will be only a matter of time before convincing simulations of creative processes are available, if indeed they are not available already.

There is, we believe, good reason to think that the still mysterious and baffling aura that surrounds creativity will be with us for the foreseeable

-173-

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Changing the World: A Framework for the Study of Creativity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - A Framework for the Study of Creativity 1
  • References 40
  • 2 - The Fruits of Asynchrony: A Psychological Examination of Creativity 47
  • Notes 66
  • References 66
  • 3 - The Creators' Patterns 69
  • Notes 82
  • References 83
  • 4 - Creativity: Proof That Development Occurs 85
  • References 98
  • 5 - Creativity: Dreams, Insights, and Transformations 103
  • Note 132
  • References 132
  • 6 - The Domain of Creativity 135
  • References 155
  • 7 - Mamas Versus Genes: Notes from the Culture Wars 159
  • 8 - Conclusion: Creativity Research on the Verge 173
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 179
  • About the Authors 181
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