Northern Labor and Antislavery: A Documentary History

By Philip S. Foner; Herbert Shapiro | Go to book overview
Save to active project

V
From the 1850s Crisis
to Civil War

IN THIS SECTION DOCUMENTS ARE PRESENTED THAT FOCUS UPON LABOR'S RELATION TO THE SLAVERY QUESTION, RANGING FROM THE 1850s CRISIS TRIGGERED BY THE KANSAS-NEBRASKA ACT TO THE FINAL MONTHS OF THE CIVIL WAR.

1. Pittsburgh workers call upon all Pennsylvania workers to act against slavery in the 1856 election.


THE GREAT ISSUE

ADDRESS OF THE WORKING MEN OF PITTSBURGH TO THEIR FELLOW WORKING MEN OF PENNSYLVANIA

The undersigned, workingmen of the City of Pittsburgh, convinced that our interests as a class are seriously involved in the present political struggle, send greeting to you, our fellow workingmen of Pennsylvania asking you to aid in the protection of our common rights, now in great peril. We hold it to be a part of the system of free government, that each class of the people should understand and uphold its own rights. Concessions in matters of subordinate importance must be made for the sake of general harmony and the public welfare, but when a question arises involving the political equality of a class, or the constitutional rights of its individual members, stern resistance becomes a duty. "Eternal vigilance"--vigilance of the people against their leaders--"is the price of liberty." So we are told by one of those leaders--one of the foremost among the founders of our Constitution. Fellow workingmen, we believe that this vigilance is called for now. We believe that a great scheme is in progress which endangers our most cherished rights. We call upon you to look to your interest yourselves, judging by facts as they stand, and disregarding party prejudices, and interested office hunting advisers. Some of these facts, it is the object of this Address to lay before you. We are neither politicians nor office-seekers. We would speak with you as brothers; if we err, let us meet with brotherly forgiveness; if we speak the words of truth

-242-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Northern Labor and Antislavery: A Documentary History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?