New Poverty: Families in Postmodern Society

By David Cheal | Go to book overview

Preface

This book is intended to inspire serious, critical reflection on the relationships between current family situations and the risks of being poor today. There are many reasons for concern. Some of them are: the existence of a life course poverty gradient, in which the risk of poverty is highest in early childhood; the fact that families with children do not appear to benefit significantly from government income redistribution; and the politics of fiscal programs that both alleviate and increase poverty risks, for different groups.

The waning interest of governments in supporting poor people forces us to reexamine some fundamental understandings about modernization and progress. In this book, specific causes of poverty are located within a broader context of problems in modernity. The author argues that the sociology of poverty has entered a new, postmodern phase.

Chapters 1 and 2 contain general discussions about the cultural and political significance of poverty research. The main theme in those chapters can be stated very simply. It is that new forms of poverty can be fully understood only in the context of theories of social change.

Poverty as it exists today evidently has something to do with a special set of changes known collectively as modernization. But what is the connection, exactly? The most common answer is that poverty is due to certain imperfections in the process of modernization itself. Further, it is hoped that correcting those imperfections can reduce the impact of

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Poverty: Families in Postmodern Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Table of Contents xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • 1 - Families in Postmodernity 1
  • 2 - Poverty and Progress 17
  • 3 - Sorting Out the Poor 35
  • 4 - Marriage and Its Aftermath 55
  • 5 - The Birth of Poverty 75
  • 6 - Family Work Systems 97
  • 7 - Shallow Income Pools 117
  • 8 - The Economic Life Course 135
  • 9 - Shifting Entitlements 157
  • 10 - The Postmodernization of Poverty 173
  • Bibliography 187
  • Index 203
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 209

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.