There's No Place like Home: Anthropological Perspectives on Housing and Homelessness in the United States

By Anna Lou Dehavenon | Go to book overview

reliance on the private sector to respond to the homeless people we see around us. With a prolonged economic downturn and fewer public dollars available for homeless services, demands on the private sector will become greater. This trend will have an impact on the homeless and on religious communities in every municipality. If conservative religious groups--the Christian fundamentalists--sponsor most agencies, then local communities may welcome the decline in government involvement. Delivery of basic services would then survive in an environment less interested in causes and solutions than in the immediacy of saving selected souls.

In Albuquerque, the majority of provider agencies are managed by Christian fundamentalists. These groups appear to be expanding both their role and their influence on homeless services. If this trend continues, then the range of alternative responses to the homeless would become increasingly limited, and service delivery would become more restricted to those individuals most amenable to evangelical calls for rehabilitation and "right living." Mainstream religious agencies, concerned with benefiting their own membership, appear oblivious to this movement. They are not alert to the fact that a significant downturn in public funding would jeopardize their efforts and diminish the scope of services they wish to promote. Fundamentalists, by avoiding public scrutiny, push for a bootstrap approach that classifies homeless persons according to their capacity to cooperate with a particular rehabilitation plan. They deal with those who are judged worthy of assistance and rationalize their rejection and abandonment of others. Moreover, the fundamentalists' lack of interest in deeper causes and broader solutions may doom community response to homelessness to simplistic reactions and discourage measures that promise to halt the rise in numbers of homeless persons.


NOTES
1.
By "public sector" involvement I mean primarily government participation, whether local, state, or federal. The "private sector" commonly connotes business involvement in community or national life, but here it refers to what is called the "nonprofit sector," or "independent sector," specifically with reference to religious organizations (cf. Hall1992).
2.
Demographic information is extrapolated from three separate provider-agency surveys of the local homeless population conducted in 1991, and an earlier city-funded enumeration and demographic study ( Robertson 1987). These surveys provide the most reliable data on the area's homeless population. However, they are skewed toward the service- using portion of the population.
3.
As of 1993, there were fifteen direct, exclusively homeless-assisting agencies in Albuquerque providing basic services--shelter, food, and clothing. At the time research was conducted, there were only fourteen such agencies. (One additional agency was providing health care service to the homeless.) However, I do not wish to discount additional basic services for homeless persons from local friends, family, or other sources in the community, from time to time. My focus here is on service providers and agencies, not local alternative resources, which have been examined elsewhere ( Robertson 1987).
4.
These agencies' only reason for being is to provide services for homeless people.

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
There's No Place like Home: Anthropological Perspectives on Housing and Homelessness in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contemporary Urban Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Prologue: Azdak Lives xi
  • Notes xiv
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Conclusion xx
  • 1: Poverty and Homelessness in Rural Upstate New York 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Summary and Recommendations 13
  • Conclusion 16
  • Notes 16
  • 2: The 1990 Decennial Census and Patterns of Homelessness in a Small New England City 19
  • Introduction 19
  • Summary and Recommendations 30
  • Conclusion 33
  • Note 33
  • 3: Doubling-Up: A Strategy of Urban Reciprocity to Avoid Homelessness in Detroit 35
  • Introduction 35
  • Summury and Recommendations 46
  • Conclusion 48
  • Notes 48
  • 4: Doubling-Up and New York City's Policies for Sheltering Homeless Families 51
  • Introduction 51
  • Summary and Recomendations 63
  • Conclusion 64
  • Conclusion 65
  • 5: A Home by Any Means Necessary: Government Policy on Squatting in the Public Housing of a Large Mid-Atlantic City 67
  • Introduction 67
  • Summary and Recommendations 76
  • Conclusion 78
  • Notes 78
  • 6: Huts for the Homeless: A Low- Technology Approach for Squatters in Atlanta, Georgia 81
  • Introduction 81
  • Summary and Recommendations 100
  • Conclusion 102
  • 7: Piety and Poverty: The Religious Response to the Homeless in Albuquerque, New Mexico 105
  • Introduction 105
  • Summary and Recommendations 114
  • Conclusion 116
  • Conclusion 117
  • 8: Suburban Homelessness and Social Space: Strategies of Authority and Local Resistance in Orange County, California 121
  • Introduction 121
  • Summary and Recommendations 140
  • Conclusion 141
  • Conclusion 142
  • 9: "There Goes the Neighborhood": Gentrification, Displacement, and Homelessness in Washington, D.C. 145
  • Introdution 145
  • Summary and Recommendations 160
  • Conclusions 162
  • Conclusions 163
  • Conclusion 165
  • Epilogue: A Perilous Bridge 175
  • References 177
  • Index 193
  • Contributors 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.