Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

By Marilyn Kern-Foxworth | Go to book overview
Deletion of the's suffix marking the possessive, e.g., " John book" = "John's book."
Deletion of the's suffix marking the plural, e.g., "whole lotta song" = "a lot of songs."
Use of a pleonastic noun, e.g., " John, he live in New York" = "John lives in New York."
7
For more about the makeover, see: Julie Liesse Erickson, "Aunt Jemima Makeover", Advertising, May 1, 1989, p. 8; "Aunt Jemima Gets New Hairdo, Keeps Same Smile", Bryan-College Station Eagle, April 28, 1989, p. 9; "Aunt Jemima Grays", Houston Post, April 28, 1989, p. A2; "Quaker Oats Is Shedding New Light on Aunt Jemima", Wall Street Journal, April 28, 1989, p. A4; "You've Come a Long Way, Jemima", Emerge, January 1990, p. 31; "Aunt Jemima Updated"," Houston Chronicle, April 30, 1989, p. 2A; "Aunt Jemima Trademark to Get 1990s Makeover", Jet, May 15, 1989.

REFERENCES

Abrahams Roger D. 1977. Talking Black. Rowley, Mass.: Newbury House.

Allport F. H. 1924. Social Psychology. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Allport Gordon. 1954. The Nature of Prejudice. Reading, Mass.: AddisonWesley.

Anderson James. 1976. "Aunt Jemima in Dialectics: Genovese on Slave Culture". Journal of Negro History 61: 99.

Anderson Johana Gast. 1979. More Twentieth Century Dolls from Bisque to Vinyl. Des Moines: Wallace Homestead Book Company.

Andrews Benny. 1975. "Jemimas, Mysticism, and Mojos: The Art of Betye Saar". Encore American and Worldwide, March 17, p. 30.

Angelou Maya. 1981. "Song for the Old Ones". In Maya Anyelou: Poems. New York: Bantam Books.

Assael Henry. 1987. Consumer Behavior and Marketing Action. Boston: Kent Publishing Company.

Atwan Robert, Donald McQuade, and John W. Wright. 1979. Edsels, Luckies and Frigidaires. Advertising the American Way. New York: Dell Publishing Company.

"Aunt Jemima of Pancake Box Fame Dies at 76". 1981. Knoxville ( Tenn.) NewsSentinel, April 2, p. 9.

"Aunt Jemima Trademark to Be Updated". 1989. Press release issued by the Quaker Oats Company, Chicago, April 27.

Barnett Marquerite Ross. 1982. "Nostalgia as Nightmare: Blacks and American Popular Culture". The Crisis, (February): 42.

Berry Jon. "Marketers Reach Out to Blacks". Chicago Tribune, May 12, 1991, p. 9A.

The Black Mammy Monument. 1923. New York Age, January 6, p. 4.

Bogle Donald. 1973. Coons, Mulattoes, Mammies and Bucks. New York: Viking.

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • References xxi
  • Chapter 1 - Slave Advertisements: A Mirror to the "Peculiar Institution" 1
  • Notes 25
  • References 26
  • Chapter 2 - Memories of the Way We Were: Blacks in Early Print and Electronic Advertising 29
  • Notes 41
  • References 41
  • Chapter 3 - Myths, Lies, and Stereotypes: Black Advertising Symbols, Characters, and Models 43
  • References 58
  • Chapter 4 - Aunt Jemia: The Most Battered` Woman in America Rises to the Top 61
  • Appendix: Chronology of Important Dates in the History of Aunt Jemima 107
  • Notes 108
  • References 109
  • Chapter 5 Invisible Consumers: Gaining Equal Representation for Blacks in Advertising 115
  • Notes 127
  • References 127
  • Chapter 6 - Separate and Definitely Not Equal: Frequency of Blacks in Advertising 131
  • Notes 146
  • References 146
  • Chapter 7 - Blacks in Advertising: Critics Give Two Thumbs Up 149
  • Notes 163
  • References 164
  • Chapter 8 - Epilogue: Colorizing Advertising: a 21st-Century Challenge 167
  • Notes 172
  • References 172
  • Appendix: African-American Museums and Resource Centers 175
  • Selected Bibliography 183
  • Index 191
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 205

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.