Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

By Marilyn Kern-Foxworth | Go to book overview

become antiquated as these astute consumers realize their worth in the global marketplace and systematically and methodically begin spending their money with businesses that recognize every color in the national rainbow.


NOTE
1
The following are the treatments for the commercials used to"conduct the study by Pitts ( 1989):

FIRST COMMERCIAL

Crest Toothpaste

Theme line: "Aren't your kids worth Crest?

Opening Sequence: A telephone conversation between a young boy at home and his father, at work. The son is asking the father if he will be able to attend his concert that night.

Singer: "Sometimes you go through changes for your children's happiness". Family values centrally focused upon the child. "He's your pride and joy, your little boy, he's the reason you switched to Crest".

Sequential Shot: We see the boy getting ready for the orchestra concert and the father at work hurrying to join the family. "Will he make it?" Tension is created as mom and sister are settled in their seats, the boy is poised holding his instrument, scanning the audience for his father. Just as the concert is about to begin Dad slips into his seat, to the joy of the family.

Singer: "Aren't your kids worth it? Aren't your kids worth Crest?"

SECOND COMMERCIAL

McDonald's

Opening Sequence: A weary working mother picks up her small, young boy at the community day-care center.

Singer: "You can't be together till your work is through."

Sequence: Mother and son ride a bus together; Mom falls asleep. Head shots of the boy show his big, beautiful eyes; the wonder of a child.

Singen: "He's only three, so treasure this moment, you know they won't last, time is flying, children grow up fast, take a little break today: at McDonald's."

Sequence: The bus pulls up in front of McDonald's and there's Dad. The family is united at McDonald's: helping the family get together. The commercial ends with Joey sleeping on Dad's shoulder, clutching his McDonald's Kids Meal box.

THIRD COMMERCIAL

Ford

Opening Sequence: A young, handsome man stands looking out the floor-to

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