Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

By Marilyn Kern-Foxworth | Go to book overview
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ceiling window of a huge, urban office. The furniture is modern; the art is excellent. The background music is hot jazz, the sax voice is bouncy.

Announcer: "I've got the keys to my new office and the keys to my new Thunderbird."

Slow-Mo Sequence: Beaming with joy, he throws his keys in the air. As the keys come down cut to:

Sequence: Exterior shot of a very attractive, very well-dressed young woman waiting anxiously. Cut to the car's interior: the man inspects the details of the instrument panel. Cut to young woman, still in anticipation.

Sequence: Beauty shots of the car driving in a lovely city setting. Cut to the car pulling up to the young woman. She joins him in the car, they kiss, and they drive, in love, in his new Ford.

Singers: "Have you driven a Ford lately?"

FOURTH COMMERCIAL

Coca-Cola

Opening Sequence: Fast paced, high-energy marching band beat.

Singers: (Chanting) "Coke is it!"

Sequence: A dress rehearsal of the Grambling State Marching Band on a dry, dusty field. Fun, and hot summer sun.

Singers: "Your thirst is grand as a big marching band."

Sequence: Quick, funky, highly synchronized band steps, teamwork, and sweat; lots of quick cuts. Intercuts of a hot sun and pan shots of moisture beading on Coke cans and bottles. Coke is shown as the relief from the broiling summer sun as perspiring band members, seeking relief, pull Coke bottles out of tubs of ice. The band's joy is in the music, the dancing, each other, and in Coca-Cola.

Singers: "Coke is it!"

The commercials were produced by the largest black advertising agency, the Uniworld Group of Chicago.

REFERENCES

Allport Gordon. 1962. The Nature of Prejudice. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.

Atwan, Robert, Donald McQuade, and John W. Wright. 1979. Edsels, Luckies and Frigidaires. Advertising the American Way. New York: Dell Publishing Company.

Barban, Arnold, and Edward Cundiff. 1964. "Negro and White Response to Advertising Stimuli". Journal of Marketing Research 1 (November): 53-56.

Barban, Arnold, and Werner Grunbaum. 1965. "A Factor Analytic Study of Negro and White Responses to Advertising Stimuli". Journal of Applied Psychology 49 (August): 274-79.

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