American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

By Steve Shipp | Go to book overview

Gleyre. Originally from South Carolina, Henry grew up in New York City, where he began formal studies under Walter M. Oddie. He continued studies in Philadelphia and Paris, and became particularly inspired by small genre scenes depicting people in daily activities. Henry opened his own studio in New York City in 1862 and began spending summers at Cragsmoor in 1872. He settled there permanently in 1883, in a house that he designed. Henry also achieved much popularity for a series of Civil War scenes that he sketched during battles in Virginia.

George Inness Jr. ( 1853-1926), son of noted American landscape painter George Inness, had early training with his father in Rome before going to Paris in 1875 and entering the atelier of Léon Bonnat. After returning to the United States, he shared a studio in the late 1870s with his father in New York City. During the 1880s he illustrated articles on big game hunting for major magazines, and later became quite popular for his paintings depicting animals. In the mid-1890s, young Inness decided his work was too similar to that of his father's (who died in 1894) and sailed for Europe after destroying most of his early paintings. Art critic Royal Cortissoz said Inness, who signed his paintings " Inness Jr.," was an artist who "felt the tender beauty in landscape and interpreted it with a king of quiet emotion."8 Explaining his own feeling, Inness once said: "My art, to me, represents music, and as I paint, I feel through color and line the rhythm of music, as the waves of sound bring visions of form and color to my mind."9 Inness settled at Cragsmoor in 1900, but maintained a residence in New York City and spent his winters in Tarpon Springs, Florida. In 1917, he published a book about his father, The Life and Letters of George Inness.

Arthur I. Keller ( 1866-1925), a Cragsmoor artist who achieved recognition as a painter and illustrator, began his career as a lithographer at age seventeen in New York City. Three years later he studied in Munich under Ludwig von Loefftz. Keller preferred to paint in oils and watercolors but derived much of his income from illustrations.

Helen M. Turner ( 1858-1959), who studied in New York City under * Kenyon Cox, was elected to full membership in the National Academy of Design in 1921. She divided her time for several years between Cragsmoor and New York City. Many of her Cragsmoor paintings depicted models with a background of colorful flowers, often relaxing on the porch of her studio.


NOTES
1.
Quoted in Buff, Antiques, November 1978, p. 1056.
2.
Quoted in Buff, Antiques, November 1978, p. 1056.
3.
Quoted in Samuels and Samuels, p. 29.

-28-

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American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes 1
  • Chapter 2 Cornish Art Colony 11
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter 3 Cos Cob Art Colony 19
  • Notes 23
  • Chapter 4 Cragsmoor Art Colony 25
  • Notes 28
  • Chapter 5 East Hampton Art Colony 31
  • Notes 36
  • Chapter 6 Gloucester-Rockport Art Colony 37
  • Chapter 7 Laguna Beach Art Colony 43
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 8 Lawrence Park Art Colony 49
  • Notes 53
  • Chapter 9 New Hope Art Colony 55
  • Notes 61
  • Chapter 10 North Conway Art Colony 63
  • Notes 69
  • Chapter 11 Old Lyme Art Colony 71
  • Notes 80
  • Chapter 12 Provincetown Art Colony 83
  • Chapter 13 Santa Barbara Art Colony 93
  • Notes 96
  • Chapter 14 Santa Fe Art Colony 97
  • Chapter 15 Taos Art Colony 109
  • Chapter 16 Woodstock Art Colony 123
  • Notes 128
  • Bibliography 129
  • Index 139
  • About the Author 161
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