American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

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Sheldon Jacobs Smillie ( 1854-1926), was a genre painter who achieved modest recognition for her work. According to Champney, Nellie Smillie "discovered in East Hampton suggestive figure-subjects and old-fashioned costumes which . . . led her to wander in the tempting paths of the olden time." 21 In later years the Smillies resided at the Lawrence Park art colony in Bronxville.

Carleton Wiggins ( 1849-1932), born in Orange County, New York, spent summers at East Hampton during the 1890s. Noted for his paintings of sheep and cattle, Wiggins turned to animal paintings after failing to achieve success with his landscapes. He later settled at the Old Lyme art colony in Connecticut.

Lemuel Maynard Wiles ( 1926-1905), who achieved prominence as a landscape artist, figure painter, and teacher, had early formal training in Albany, New York, with landscape specialist William Hart and then in New York City with Jasper Francis Cropsey, also known for his landscapes. He visited East Hampton and other eastern Long Island areas frequently during the 1880s and 1890s in search of subject matter. In 1886, he painted the birthplace of John Howard Payne, lyricist of the popular song "Home, Sweet Home." Wiles, who opened his own studio in New York in 1864, taught drawing for several years in Albany and Utica, along with summer sessions at various universities. His son, Irving Ramsey Wiles ( 1861- 1948), became a well-known portrait painter.


NOTES
1.
Pisano ( 1985), p. 3.
2.
Laffan, Scribner's Monthly, February 1879, p. 464.
3.
Laffan, Scribner's Monthly, February 1879, p. 465.
4.
Laffan, Scribner's Monthly, February 1879, p. 472.
5.
Champney, Century Magazine, October 1885, p. 849.
6.
Champney, Century Magazine, October 1885, p. 849.
7.
Champney, Century Magazine, October 1885, p. 8 50).
8.
Quoted in Wilkins, p. 135.
9.
Quoted in Wilkins, p. 136.
10.
Wilkins, p. 136.
11.
Pisano ( 1985), p. 142.
12.
Quoted in Pisano ( 1985) p. 142.
13.
Price, International Studio, April 1923, p. 4.
14.
Pisano ( 1985), p. 136.
15.
Pisano ( 1985), p. 136.
16.
Champney, Century Magazine, October 1885, p. 852.
17.
Pisano ( 1985), p. 102.
18.
Quoted in Anbinder, p. 357.
19.
Pisano ( 1985), p. 102.
20.
Champney, Century Magazine, October 1985, p. 850.
21.
Champney, Century Magazine, October 1885, p. 850.

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