American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

By Steve Shipp | Go to book overview

reer. In 1936, for instance, Esquire named Speicher" America's most important living painter."19 Speicher, born in Buffalo, New York, studied in Buffalo and New York. He began spending summers at Woodstock in 1907, then bought a small home and studio there in 1910. With income from his lucrative portrait commissions, Speicher pursued his interest in landscapes and flower paintings and made long visits to Europe during the 1920s and 1930s. Historian Ernest W. Watson, quoting an unnamed art critic in 1942, said: "The only museums which have not Speicher's paintings are: (1) those which are going to get them, and (2) those which cannot afford the luxury."20 As noted by writer Ivan Narodny: "The art of Eugene Speicher is an American rhapsody--noble, classic and masterly."21 Writer Walter Gutman said: "With Speicher, one enjoys the sensation of form."22 Speicher himself once said his purpose was to express "something that will be a tonic to stir the imagination, a pleasure to the eye, and reflect my sense of quality in life."23 On another occasion he said: "Painting is like playing with electricity. Touch the brush to one part and something immediately happens at the opposite side of the canvas. One part must be played against the others, gradually bringing the whole into a state of balance and unity. And unity in a work of art is one of the most distinguishing qualities, as is style."24


NOTES
1.
Brecht, p. 2.
2.
Malone, p. 1.
3.
Anbinder, p. 77.
4.
Wolf, p. 57.
5.
Wolf, p. 70.
6.
Guitar, p. 89.
7.
Hoeber, International Studio, July 1911, p. iii.
8.
Zellman, p. 817.
9.
Muller, International Studio, June 1925, p. 210.
10.
Muller, International Studio, June 1925, p. 210.
11.
Anbinder, p. 314.
12.
Quoted in "Doris Lee's Humor," Art Digest, January 15, 1941, p. 12.
13.
Quoted in "Doris Lee's, Americana," Art Digest, March 15, 1936, p. 20.
14.
Quoted in Wolf, p. 117.
15.
Watson, p. 70.
16.
Watson, p. 73.
17.
Quoted in Pearson, p. 245.
18.
Watson, p. 85.
19.
Wolf, p. 132.
20.
Watson, American Artist, October 1942, p. 5.
21.
Narodny, p. 99.
22.
Gutman, Art in America, December 1928, p. 35.
23.
Quoted in Zellman, p. 833.
24.
Watson, American Artist, October 1942, p. 7.

-128-

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American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes 1
  • Chapter 2 Cornish Art Colony 11
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter 3 Cos Cob Art Colony 19
  • Notes 23
  • Chapter 4 Cragsmoor Art Colony 25
  • Notes 28
  • Chapter 5 East Hampton Art Colony 31
  • Notes 36
  • Chapter 6 Gloucester-Rockport Art Colony 37
  • Chapter 7 Laguna Beach Art Colony 43
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 8 Lawrence Park Art Colony 49
  • Notes 53
  • Chapter 9 New Hope Art Colony 55
  • Notes 61
  • Chapter 10 North Conway Art Colony 63
  • Notes 69
  • Chapter 11 Old Lyme Art Colony 71
  • Notes 80
  • Chapter 12 Provincetown Art Colony 83
  • Chapter 13 Santa Barbara Art Colony 93
  • Notes 96
  • Chapter 14 Santa Fe Art Colony 97
  • Chapter 15 Taos Art Colony 109
  • Chapter 16 Woodstock Art Colony 123
  • Notes 128
  • Bibliography 129
  • Index 139
  • About the Author 161
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