Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media

By Louis W. Liebovich | Go to book overview
Save to active project

4
Lost Opportunities

No person ever entered the presidency with more justification for the usual early optimism than Herbert Hoover. He had made few commitments, had accumulated an unblemished public record, and had risen from Belgian relief administrator to president in just 14 years. He could look forward to Republican majorities in the House (100) and Senate (17). Americans were contented and as optimistic about the future as probably they had been at any time in the nation's history. Hoover finally had the power and authority to change Americans' lives for the better, and he fully intended to attack the job with all the enthusiasm and knowhow he had at his vast disposal.

But first he had to confront prying reporters. Three days after the election, Elihu Root, a former New York senator and the Secretary of State under Theodore Roosevelt, wrote to Hoover to congratulate him and to advise him to stay away from Washington until after the inauguration. Hoover wrote to Root:

I agree with you that I should keep entirely out of Washington and also that I should keep in the background as much as possible. It was partially with this in mind that I have undertaken the South American journey, and I am proposing to stay in Florida or somewhere away from Washington until March 4th. 1

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?