Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media

By Louis W. Liebovich | Go to book overview

War I veteran himself, asked the former president to direct postwar food relief. In a tearful scene in Truman's office, Hoover gratefully accepted the challenge and traveled 35,000 miles throughout Europe to once again oversee the movement and distribution of food to thousands of starving Europeans. 121 The ex-president also oversaw two commissions on the reorganization of the executive branch in 1947 under Truman and again in 1954 under Dwight D. Eisenhower. Deaf and nearly blind, Hoover died of colon cancer in 1964, somewhat vindicated, but never able to recapture the popularity among reporters and citizens that had marked his early career. As Roger Simon suggested in 1992, ex-presidents, especially those unpopular with reporters, suffer for a long, long time.


NOTES
1.
Arthur Schlesinger, The Age of Roosevelt: The Crisis of the Old Order 1919-1933 ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1957), p. 440.
2.
Herbert Hoover, The Memoirs of Herbert Hoover: The Great Depression 1929-1941 ( New York: Macmillan, 1952), p. 218 [hereafter Hoover memoirs, vol. 3].
3.
Hoover, for instance, told Press Secretary Theodore Joslin in late 1931: "I don't give a damn, Ted, whether I am re-nominated or not." Joslin noted in his diary that it was good for Hoover to blow off steam in private, but that he wanted another term more than anything else. Theodore Joslin diary, Presidential Papers, Individuals, Theodore Joslin, Box 10, Nov. 30, 1931, diary entry.
4.
"Ritchie Makes Bid for the Presidency", The New York Times, Jan. 15, 1931, p. 1.
5.
"Pinchot's Hat Sails into the Ring", Literary Digest, June 20, 1931, pp. 8- 9. See also "Pinchot Attacks Utilities for 'Graft,'" The New York Times, June 16, 1931, p. 1; "Norris to Bolt the Hoover Standard Again; He Joins with Long in Backing Roosevelt", The New York Times, May 6, 1932, p. 1.
6.
Calvin Coolidge, "Party Loyalty and the Presidency", Saturday Evening Post, 204, no. 14 ( Oct. 3, 1931), pp. 3-4.
7.
"Speaking of Candidates", Literary Digest, Jan. 16, 1932, pp. 8-9.
8.
Walter Lippmann column, "Today and Tomorrow," New York Herald Tribune, Jan. 8, 1932.
9.
See Jordan A. Schwarz, The Interregnum of Despair. Hoover, Congress, and the Depression ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1970), p. 180.
12.
"Hails Genius of Hoover," circular of the Republican National Committee, 1932, Reprint File for 1932, HHPL.
13.
Elliott Thurston, "Hoover Can Not Be Elected," Scribner's, January 1932, pp. 13-16.
15.
Henry B. Russell, "Hoover Can Be Elected," Scribner's, March 1932, pp. 11-15.

-203-

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Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue xi
  • Note xv
  • 1 - The Unlikely Road to Success 1
  • Notes 20
  • 2 - Secretary of Commerce 29
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - The Campaign and Aftermath of the 1928 Election 57
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Lost Opportunities 83
  • Notes 97
  • 5 - The Crash 101
  • Notes 125
  • 6 - Radio, Newsreels, Newspapers, and the Presidency 131
  • Notes 150
  • 7 - The Bonus March 155
  • Notes 177
  • 8 - The Dawn of the Roosevelt Era 183
  • Notes 203
  • Epilogue 209
  • Note 211
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 217
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