Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Documentary History

By Timothy Walch; Dwight M. Miller | Go to book overview
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2 Partisan Politics

The friendly, working partnership between Hoover and Roosevelt ended as the two men moved up the ranks in their respective political parties. By 1928, Hoover had become the favored candidate to receive the Republican nomination for president. Roosevelt was to become the Democratic candidate for Governor of New York and a stalwart behind the candidacy of Al Smith, the Democratic candidate for president.

It is reasonable to date the abrupt end of the Hoover-Roosevelt partnership with the first letter in this chapter. Although not an exchange between the two men, it is clearly an attack on Hoover by Roosevelt that was sent to Hoover's close friend and associate Julius Barnes. Barnes was shocked to receive such a letter and said so to Roosevelt in his reply. There is little doubt that Hoover was informed about the contents of the letter.

It is likely that Hoover was embittered by the letter. Above all other qualities, Hoover valued loyalty and dignity. He and Roosevelt had worked together for over a decade; indeed, he had helped Roosevelt in his work on the American Construction Council! To be repaid with such an attack was despicable in Hoover's thinking.

Roosevelt had a completely different perspective. His letter to Barnes was a form letter, nothing more. Although he had nothing to say on the matter, Roosevelt likely saw his attacks on Hoover as politics, pure and simple. After Hoover won the election, Roosevelt congratulated the new president. That did not mean, however, that the new governor of New York was going to let the new

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