Intellectual Property in the Information Age: The Politics of Expanding Ownership Rights

By Debora J. Halbert | Go to book overview

copyright. These chapters illustrate how new technology is gradually being incorporated into the traditional story in an effort to avoid the possible transformation that can occur if information is allowed to flow freely. The traditional copyright story, which emphasizes sovereignty, tends to transform citizens who care little about ownership of creative work and information into good consumers of information who will respect the boundaries of intellectual property.


NOTES
1
M. J. Shapiro, "Sovereignty and exchange in the orders of modernity", Alternatives, 16 ( 1991): 448.
2
M. J. Shapiro, Reading "Adam Smith": Desire, history and value ( Newbury Park, CA, London, & New Delhi: SAGE Publications, 1993), 38.
3
M. Rose, Authors and owners: The invention of copyright ( London & Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1993), 133.
4
The larger question of social construction as always framing our realities is taken up by Pierre Bourdieu and Peter Burger and Thomas Luckman. See: P. Bourdieu , Outline of a theory of practice, trans. R. Nice ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977); see also: P. Berger, & T. Luckman, The social construction of reality: A treatise in the sociology of knowledge ( Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1996).
5
"We reach here the very principle of myth: It transforms history into nature." See: R. Barthes, Mythologies, trans. A. Lavers ( New York: Hill & Wang, 1972), 129.
6
B. Sherman, & A. Strowel, Of authors and origins: Essays on copyright law ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994), 1.
8
P. Goldstein, "Copyright", Law and Contemporary Problems ( Spring 1992): p. 80.
9
M. E. Katsh, The electronic media and the transformation of law ( New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989), 34.
10
J. Habermas, The structural transformation of the public sphere: An inquiry into a category of bourgeois society, trans. T. Burger, ( Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1989); B. Anderson, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism, 2nd ed. ( London & New York: Verso, 1991).
11
For this brief history see: D. Lange, "At play in the fields of the work: Copyright and the construction of authorship in the post-literate millennium", Law and Contemporary Problems ( Spring 1992): 140.
12
M. Rose, "The author as proprietor: Donaldson v. Becket and the genealogy of modern authorship", Representations, 23 (Summer 1988): 56.
13
Ibid.
14
Ibid.
15
Rose, Authors and owners, 37.

-19-

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Intellectual Property in the Information Age: The Politics of Expanding Ownership Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xvi
  • 1 - The Historical Construction of Copyright 1
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - Controlling Technology: Political Narratives of Copyright 25
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Controlling Technology: Legal Narratives of Copyright 49
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - International Piracy: Finding External Intellectual Property Threats 77
  • Notes 94
  • 5 - Hackers: the Construction of Deviance in the Information Age 101
  • Notes 114
  • 6 - Authors in the Information Age 121
  • Notes 138
  • 7 - The Future of Intellectual Property Law 141
  • Notes 159
  • Bibliography 165
  • Index 181
  • About the Author *
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