Intellectual Property in the Information Age: The Politics of Expanding Ownership Rights

By Debora J. Halbert | Go to book overview

The NII provides a mechanism for circumventing the traditional controlling structures of the culture industry. Additionally, new technologies provide the technical support to "liberate" texts from their bounded form. The impact of new technologies are multiple and the possibility of new myths very real. Because we are standing at a gateway to the future, it is important to understand how that future is interpretively constructed, and who benefits most from that construction.


NOTES
1
Office of Technology Assessment, Intellectual property rights in an age of electronics and information, summary (OTA-CIT-303) ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, April 1986), 78.
2
"Porn on the Internet", Time ( 3 July 1995): 38.
3
OTA, Intellectual property in an age of electronics, 190.
4
National Writers Union, Electronic publishing issues, a working paper [OnLine], Available: University of Maryland Gopher ≪anon@info.umd.edu≫ ( 30 June 1993).
5
M. J. Shapiro, Reading "Adam Smith": Desire, history and value, Newbury Park, CA, London, & New Delhi: Sage ( 1993), 37.
6
The National Information Infrastructure Protection Act of 1995 was reintroduced in 1996 as the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act of 1996. At this reading, the bill has passed in the Senate and has been referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary. To find current legislative information and to track bills go to: http://thomas.loc.gov.
7
See the statements of Representative Burman in No Electronic Theft (NET) Act, ( 1997, November 4), Congressional Record, Vol. 143, 152, p. H9887.
8
OTA, Intellectual property in an age of electronics, 23.
18
OTA report on intellectual property rights in an age of electronics and information: Joint hearing of the subcommittee on patents, copyrights, and trademarks of the senate committee on the judiciary and the subcommittee on courts, civil liberties, and the administration of justice of the house committee on the judiciary. 99th Cong., 2nd Session ( 16 April 1986).
19
From the prepared statement of D. Linda Garcia, OTA Report, Joint Hearing, p. 12.
21
Ibid., 13. In another speech given by D. Linda Garcia to the Library of Congress Network Advisory Committee Meeting, some light is shed on why

-45-

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Intellectual Property in the Information Age: The Politics of Expanding Ownership Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xvi
  • 1 - The Historical Construction of Copyright 1
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - Controlling Technology: Political Narratives of Copyright 25
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Controlling Technology: Legal Narratives of Copyright 49
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - International Piracy: Finding External Intellectual Property Threats 77
  • Notes 94
  • 5 - Hackers: the Construction of Deviance in the Information Age 101
  • Notes 114
  • 6 - Authors in the Information Age 121
  • Notes 138
  • 7 - The Future of Intellectual Property Law 141
  • Notes 159
  • Bibliography 165
  • Index 181
  • About the Author *
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