Studies in Newspaper and Periodical History: 1995 Annual

By Michael Harris ; Tom O'Malley | Go to book overview

sumption. Following this line would give the serial a central position, not as a distinct form but as a core element in the total output of print. As indicated here, my own preference would be for an agreed version of the latter. However, there are a range of intermediate alternatives, all of which still needing to be identified and discussed. Locating the serial is going to be a long but stimulating process.


NOTES
1
Paul Langford, A Polite and Commercial People: England, 1727-1783 ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989); Public Life and the Propertied Englishman, 1689-1798 ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991). The general omission of print from socioeconomic history is equally evident in the work of Peter Earle.
2
Jeremy Black, The English Press in the Eighteenth Century ( London: Croom Helm, 1987).
3
Stanley Morison, "The Bibliography of Newspapers and the Writing of History," The Library, Ser. 5, ix ( 1954), pp. 153-75.
4
Anne Goldgar, Impolite Learning: Conduct and Community in the Republic of Letters, 1680-1750 ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995).
5
Peter Davison, ed., The Book Encompassed: Studies in Twentieth-Century Bibliography ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992).
6
Thomas R. Adams and Nicolas Barker, "A New Model for the Study of the Book," in A Potencie of Life: Books in Society, ed. Nicolas Barker ( London: British Library, 1993).
7
For essays concerned with different approaches to the study of the periodical literature of the nineteenth century see, Laurel Brake, Aled Jones and Lionel Madden , eds., Investigating Victorian Journalism ( London: Macmillan, 1990).
8
The complexity of local structures involving the newspaper are only just beginning to emerge. See C. Y. Ferdinand, "Local Distribution Networks in Eighteenth-Century England," in Spreading the Word; the Distribution Networks of Print, 1550-1850, ed. Robin Myers and Michael Harris ( Winchester/ Detroit: St. Paul's Bibliographies/Omnigraphics, 1990). A full-length book by the same author based on a close analysis of the organization of the Salisbury Journal during the eighteenth century, will be published by the Oxford University Press.
9
For a preliminary discussion of the commercial divisions see Michael Harris , "Paper Pirates: the Alternative Book Trade in Mid-18th Century London," in Fakes and Frauds; Varieties of Deception in Print and Manuscript, ed. Robin Myers and Michael Harris ( Winchester/ Detroit: St. Paul's Bibliographies/Omnigraphics, 1989).
10
Michael Treadwell, "London Trade Publishers, 1675-1750," The Library, Ser. 6, iv ( 1982).
11
Robert Darnton, The Kiss of Lamourette: Reflections on Cultural History ( New York: Norton, 1990).
12
Jurgen Habermas, The Structural Tansformation of the Publick Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society, trans. Thomas Burger ( Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989).

-15-

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