Studies in Newspaper and Periodical History: 1995 Annual

By Michael Harris ; Tom O'Malley | Go to book overview

2
Sons of Liberty and Their Silenced Sisters: "Ladies" Magazines" and Women's Self-Representation in the Early Republic

Amy Beth Aronson

The first American magazine for women, the Ladies Magazine and Repository of Entertaining and Instructive Knowledge ( 1792-1793), was a novel venture in a volatile age. The "American experiment in democracy," now a new and polyglot nation that was growing and changing at an unprecedented rate, had thrown many cultural rules and roles into question. Amidst this ideological flux, one prevailing orthodoxy was the idea that women were not expected to engage in the public sphere as speakers. Yet restrictions on women's self-representation faced the incursions of a democratic culture: Liberalizing standards for public speech were rousing and inflecting public debate, and the literary marketplace was also diversifying, expanding public access to a widening range of discourse. 1 The over one hundred "ladies' magazines" that were launched in America between 1790-1830 partook of these democratizing conditions to answer the presumption of women's silence in the public realm.

The American magazine itself was a form tailor-made for the selfrepresentation deemed largely improper for a lady. Although conceived in imitation of Britain's popular eighteenth-century periodicals -- the Tatler, Spectator and Gentleman's Magazine -- the American "periodical miscellany" was distinctly keyed to the democratic conditions in which it was produced and consumed. From its inception in 1741, the American version was more inclusive, more multiple, more open than its

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Newspaper and Periodical History: 1995 Annual
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.