Studies in Newspaper and Periodical History: 1995 Annual

By Michael Harris ; Tom O'Malley | Go to book overview

work of institutions and material conditions opens up new readings of serial fiction especially. I assume that each periodical presents a distinct cultural formation, with its own particularities, within a general field of literature and culture. Linking discourses within the periodical texts to other cultural texts assumes that intertextuality operates within the textual field of methodology. Finally, I think it important to accept that readings of periodical texts are available but not definitive. Generally, I am most anxious to question why it is that periodical literature has been largely ignored in English studies and how it is that we might study periodicals in creative and productive ways. Underlining my work is a call to examine why particular forms of Victorian literature (especially popular forms) remain a neglected fields of research.


NOTES
1
Michael Wolff, "Charting the Golden Stream: Thoughts on a Directory of Victorian Periodicals," Victorian Periodicals Newsletter no. 13 ( 1971): 23-38.
2
Lyn Pykett, "Reading the Periodical Press: Text and Context," in Investigating Victorian Journalism, ed. Laurel Brake, Aled Jones and Lionel Madden ( London: Macmillan, 1990), 3-18.
3
Laurel Brake and Anne Humpherys, "Critical Theory and Periodical Research," Victorian Periodicals Review 12:3 (Fall 1989): 94-95.
4
John Sutherland, Victorian Fiction: Writers, Publishers, Readers ( London: Macmillan, 1995), 152, 153.
5
See A. J. Parry, "The Intellectuals and the Middle Class Periodical Press: Theory, Method and Case Study," Journal of Newspaper and Periodical History 4:3 (Autumn 1988): 18-32; Ros Ballaster, Margaret Beetham, Elizabeth Frazer and Sandra Hebron, Women's Worlds: Ideology, Femininity and the Woman's Magazine ( London: Macmillan, 1991); Aled Gruffyd Jones, Press, Politics and Society: A History of Journalism in Wales ( Cardiff, UK: University of Wales Press, 1993); the special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review, ed. Brake and Humpherys; and Laurel Brake, Subjugated Knowledges: Journalism, Gender and Literature in the Nineteenth Century ( London: Macmillan, 1994).
6
M. M. Bakhtin, The Dialogic Imagination, ed. Michael Holquist, trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist ( Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981), 428. There is a glossary of Bakhtin's terms at the back of the book.
9
Ibid., 276.
10
Ibid., 279. Bakhtin champions the novel as dialogic, but argues that poetry is monologic and restrictive, an assertion with which I do not agree.
11
Julia Kristeva, "Word, Dialogue and Novel," ( 1966) in The Kristeva Reader, ed. Toril Moi ( London: Basil Blackwell, 1986), 37.
12
Michael Worton and Judith Still, eds., Intertextuality: Theories and Practices ( Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1990), "Introduction," 17.
13
Vincent B. Leitch, Cultural Criticism, Literary Theory, Poststructuralism ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1992), 56.

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