Studies in Newspaper and Periodical History: 1995 Annual

By Michael Harris ; Tom O'Malley | Go to book overview

mutual suspicions between occupiers and civilians, as well as to reconcile American official occupation policy with German postwar perspectives. Unable to resolve the dilemma between their function as a tool of reeducation on the one hand, and their desire to listen to the native population on the other, the journalists eventually reacted similarly to their German readers -- furious over their own helplessness they retreated into a passivity that was really a veiled vehemence. 68

Those who cite Nuremberg today as a model for contemporary war crime trials should remember that a unique conglomeration of historical events allowed for such a trial. In 1945 there were victors and vanquished. American lawyers who dominated the proceedings still believed that mental reeducation, regardless of the costs of such an enterprise, could change men and nations. No contemporary case aligns with this historical constellation and idealism.


NOTES
1
Norbert Frei, "Die Presse," in Die Bundesrepublik Deutschland, vol III, Kultur, ed. Wolfgang Benz (Frankfurt a. M.: Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, 1989), 274-76; Hans Habe, Im Jahre Null. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der deutschen Presse ( Munich: Verlag Kurt Desch GmbH, 1966), 27, 87; HeinzDietrich Fischer , Reeducations- und Pressepolitik unter britischem Besatzungsstatus ( Dusseldorf: Droste Verlag, 1978), 22.
2
Erich Küstner, "Streiflichter aus Nürnberg," Neue Zeitung, München (henceforth quoted as NZ), Nov. 23, 1945, Feuilleton.
3
The trial led by the International Military Tribunal opened up a whole series of other trials that subsequently took place in Nuremberg. Klaus-Jörg Ruhl , Die Besatzer und die Deutschen. Amerikanische Zone 1945-1948 (Düsseldorf. Droste verlag, 1980), 137. Bradley F. Smith, Reaching Judgment at Nuremberg ( New York: Basic Books, 1963), xiii.
4
Of the twenty-three accused, only twenty-one men were present to hear the final verdict. Robert Ley, chief of all Nazi organizations since 1937, founder of the "Labor Front" and the leisure organization "Strength through Joy" committed suicide in his prison cell on October 25, 1945. Martin Bormann, head of the party chancellery since 1941, could not be found after the German capitulation. In 1973, a West German court officially pronounced him dead. Ann Tusa and John Tusa, The Nuremberg Trial ( New York: Atheneum, 1984), 40-41, 134, 494.
5
Comprising roughly 2 million members, those organizations were dealt with as abstract entities.
6
American influences shaped the proceedings as well as the rhetoric at Nuremberg. The London Charter ratified by the four powers in the summer of 1945, which laid down the actual trial system, was merely a reflection of a plan created almost exclusively in Washington, D.C., by a group of American officials. Bradley F. Smith, The Road to Nuremberg ( New York: Basic Books, 1981), 4.
7
International law condemned the disregard of humanity and the planned breach of international peace. In the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Newspaper and Periodical History: 1995 Annual
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.