Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman

By Joann P. Krieg | Go to book overview

8 The Eisenhower Administration and Intergovernmental Relations

Carl Lieberman

The policies of the Eisenhower administration regarding intergovernmental relations have generally been characterized as state-oriented, relatively unconcerned about the problems of cities, and inclined toward inaction as compared to those of the Democratic administrations that preceded and followed it. Indeed, it has been suggested that these policies were the result of the President's personal preferences. Thus, William E. Nelson writes:

The election of Dwight D. Eisenhower to the presidency for two terms resulted in a curtailment in the growth of federal-city relations exhibited over the previous two decades. Describing himself as a "dynamic conservative," Eisenhower believed strongly that the states and the cities had the responsibility of solving their own problems without involvement or interference by the federal government. 1

In a similar vein, Roscoe Martin has stated:

. . . a strong chief executive almost uniformly brings on increased national activity, a weak or complacent one renewed emphasis on the states. Thus a Roosevelt was followed by a Taft, a Wilson by a Harding-Coolidge, a Roosevelt-Truman by an Eisenhower, and Eisenhower by a Kennedy-Johnson. The swing from centralization to decentralization and back is by no means constant, but the over-all trend is clearly discernible. 2

For the most part, scholars have failed to describe at length the policies of the Eisenhower administration regarding intergovernmental relations or to consider

The author wishes to thank Elaine Barnett, Melanie Blumberg, and Anne Schwarz for their assistance in gathering bibliographical materials and statistical data.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.