Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman

By Joann P. Krieg | Go to book overview

23
Eisenhower Revisionism and American Politics

Anthony James Joes

" Eisenhower is clearly emerging," writes Mary McAuliffe, "as one of the most important presidents of this century."1 Probably everyone is aware that such a sentiment is symptomatic of profound changes in the perception of President Eisenhower, not least in the ranks of the academic community. In a poll conducted in 1962 by Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., among American historians on the subject of presidential performance, Dwight Eisenhower placed twentieth, tied with Chester Alan Arthur and behind Benjamin Harrison and Rutherford B. Hayes. A similar poll a few years later found Eisenhower still languishing in a lowly place in the view of historians, especially with regard to "significance of achievement." 2 In stark contrast, a poll by Professor Robert Murray appearing in the December 1983 issue of the Journal of American History ranked Eisenhower as number eleven, ahead of Kennedy, Cleveland, and even Polk.

Prescinding from the question of what such polls tell us, if anything, about presidential merit, we learn much from them about opinion within the academic community. The clear shift of such opinion regarding Eisenhower is both result and cause of recent scholarly writings about him. All are aware that this newer scholarship has proceeded in a decidedly pro-Eisenhower direction, but not everyone has grasped how great a distance Eisenhower revisionism has traveled, especially in the past five or six years. This chapter will therefore not present a chronology of developments in the Eisenhower literature, a task ably performed by others. 3 Rather, we will examine certain books that have been deliberately chosen to emphasize the extent of Eisenhower revisionism. 4

In the following two sections, we will examine vintage and widely read indictments of the Eisenhower presidency. While the authors were not professional academicians, their books were quite representative of "informed opin

-283-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.