Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman

By Joann P. Krieg | Go to book overview

Director's Message to our Guests

The year 1985 will mark Hofstra University's 50th anniversary.

With this Conference on Dwight D. Eisenhower, following conferences on Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman over the last two years, Hofstra University is established as a leading historical, scholarly and commemorative center for the study of the lives, careers and administrations of the Presidents of the United States who held office during the years of our University.

For at least a year, those of us responsible for the Dwight D. Eisenhower Conference have been immersed in the events, the personalities and the global impact of the Eisenhower legacy. Things we knew before have been affirmed. Some things we thought we knew have been re-examined and reformed and are now better understood. And we learned much that we did not know.

Our search for knowledge was aided by many-- Eisenhower biographers, military colleagues, former Eisenhower officials and friends, leaders of other governments, and of course, the Eisenhower family. We are enormously grateful to all of them for their invaluable and good- spirited assistance.

We concluded that Dwight Eisenhower's career was threefold: his military achievements, his Presidency, and integral to both, his statesmanship. Hence, the Soldier, President, Statesman title of this Conference.

We have tried to develop panels, forums, roundtables and addresses dealing with those three aspects of his life. We have done so in multiple ways--through the presentation of papers by Eisenhower scholars, with the participation of important public figures who were center stage during the Eisenhower years, and with the inclusion of more contemporary national and international dignitaries and distinguished representatives of the media, who can responsibly assess the Eisenhower record and, we hope, intriguingly speculate on how Dwight Eisenhower would have dealt with current national and international issues.

One of the facts that emerged from our studies was that as a military hero, as President, and as a human being, people of all walks of life whether supporters or opponents, regardless of nationality, ideology, economic, social or educational status, remember Dwight D. Eisenhower with a uniform respect, admiration, acclaim and warmth probably unsurpassed by any other American or world figure in modern history.

We hope our Conference meets the test of doing justice to the Eisenhower memory.

We welcome our guests and we hope our three days together will be enjoyable, intellectually rewarding and historically significant.

ERIC J. SCHMERTZ Dean, Hofstra University School of Law Director, Dwight D. Eisenhower Conference

-311-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.