U.S. Presidential Primaries and the Caucus-Convention System: A Sourcebook

By James W. Davis | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Loch K. Johnson and Harlan Hahn, "Delegate Turnover at National Party Conventions," in Perspectives on Presidential Selection, ed. Donald R. Matthews ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1973), pp. 147-148. The Johnson-Hahn study, based on the official rosters of the Republican and Democratic National Conventions between 1944 and 1968, included more than 50,000 delegates and alternates.
2.
Data on Democratic delegates to the 1992 convention are all from the New York Times poll of 1,091 delegates (out of 4,319), including 182 superdelegates and 909 pledged delegates, conducted by telephone from June 18 to July 2, 1992. New York Times, July 13, 1992, p. B6.
3.
Data on Republican delegates to the 1992 GOP Convention are from a Washington Post-ABC News delegate poll, based on interviews with 511 delegates to the GOP National Convention, conducted from July 29 to August 7, 1992. Washington Post, August 16, 1992, p. A19.
4.
M. I. Ostrogorski, Democracy and the Organization of Political Parties, trans. Fredrick Clarke ( New York: The Macmillan Company, 1902), 2: 278-279.
5.
Warren J. Mitofsky and Martin Plissner, "The Making of the Delegates, 1968-1980," Public Opinion 3 ( October-November 1980): 42.
6.
Ibid.
7.
Ibid.
8.
Herbert McClosky, Paul J. Hoffman, and Rosemary O'Hara, "Issue Conflict and Consensus among Party Leaders and Followers," American Political Science Review 54, ( 1960): 406-427.
9.
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, The New Presidential Elite: Men and Women in National Politics ( New York: Russell Sage Foundation and the Twentieth Century Fund, 1976), chap. 2.
10.
John S. Jackson III, Barbara Leavitt Brown, and David Bositis, "Herbert McClosky and Friends Revisited, 1980 Democratic and Republican Elites Compared to the Mass Public," American Politics Quarterly 10 ( April 1982): 158-180.
11.
Ibid.
12.
New York Times, July 13, 1992.
13.
For further details on NEA influence in the 1980 Democratic nominating race, see "Teacher Organization Unites Behind Carter--For a Price," Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report 38 ( August 9, 1980): 2277-2279.
14.
Report of the Commission on Presidential Nomination (Hunt Commission) ( Washington, D.C.: Democratic National Committee, 1982), p. 16.
15.
The New York Times Delegate Survey consisted of 1,091 delegates (out of 4,319) including 182 superdelegates and 909 pledged delegates. The poll was conducted by telephone, June 18-July 2, 1992. New York Times, July 13, 1992, p. B6.
16.
"Superdelegates: 'Window Dressing' . . . Or the First Primary?" Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report 50 ( July 4, 1992): 18-19.
17.
Stephen J. Wayne, The Road to the White House, 1992, 4th ed. ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992), p. 97.
18.
Elaine Ciulla Kamarck and Kenneth M. Goldstein, "The Rules Do Matter:Post-Reform Presidential Nominating Politics,"

-81-

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