U.S. Presidential Primaries and the Caucus-Convention System: A Sourcebook

By James W. Davis | Go to book overview
Save to active project

9 Nominating Finance

Presidential nominating campaigns are now a big business. Money is the fuel that drives these campaigns--a dynamic component that often decides who the party nominee will be. In the 1988 presidential nominating race, which featured an open contest in both parties, the various contestants spent a grand total of $233.5 million in their quest for the White House. Preliminary spending totals for the 1996 pre-nomination race, according to the Federal Election Commission, came to $230.9 million, although only the Republican party had a contested nomination. 1

Commenting early on the 1996 race, "We've been watching an arms race," declared Herbert E. Alexander, the campaign finance expert. "It was started by Forbes [ Malcolm S. "Steve"] and his massive spending. Other candidates have felt the need to respond. Now the thing has achieved a momentum of its own," Alexander continued. 2 Forbes, the wealthy magazine publisher, pumped approximately $40 million from his own deep pockets to underwrite his flamboyant but unsuccessful drive for the Republican nomination. Forbes's rivals, especially front-runner Senator Bob Dole, were forced to counterattack Forbes with a heavy outlay of dollars. Other GOP contenders--Alexander, Buchanan, Gramm, Lugar, Keyes, and Taylor--also found themselves trying to stay in the race by scraping up nearly every dollar in their treasuries for their advertising campaigns.

By contrast, the figures for the 1960 nominating race--also an open contest--show that the various candidates of the two major parties, including Senator John F. Kennedy and Vice President Richard M. Nixon, spent a grand total of less than $3 million. 3 In the 1990s this amount would total little more than the combined candidate spending in a single presidential primary such as Florida. Indeed, the fast-moving presidential pri

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Presidential Primaries and the Caucus-Convention System: A Sourcebook
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?