Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

U.S. Presidential Primaries and the Caucus-Convention System: A Sourcebook

By James W. Davis | Go to book overview

selection of the party nominee, pick the vice presidential candidate, and hammer out the platform. The original Packwood regional primary bill (later co-sponsored by Senators Mark Hatfield [R-OR], and Ted Stevens [R-AK]) leaves each state free to decide for itself on whether or not to hold a presidential primary. Thus, the states retain much wider latitude in the management and selection of their national convention delegates. And the viability of the national convention would be less seriously threatened than under the national direct primary reform.

Although public opinion polls have showed approval for regional presidential primaries, a final vote on such proposed legislation has never been taken in the halls of Congress. Nor has there been a public outcry for primary reform, such as the recent demand for term limits for members of Congress.

However, the national primary movement could be pushed along by a twin drive for a constitutional amendment to abolish the electoral college and substitute direct election of the president without regard to state lines. As explained by Austin Ranney, "Most of the arguments against the Electoral College and in favor of direct national elections can also be made against the national party convention and in favor of a direct national primary."12 Both the electoral college and the national convention, the critics insist, are artificial devices thrust between the sovereign voters and their choosing of a president. Both of these time-honored institutions make possible the selection of a president by a minority of voters, whereas direct election of the president and a national presidential primary will always reflect the popular will, the equally weighted votes of individual citizens.

Significantly, all recent primary bills introduced since 1977 rely on acts of Congress, not constitutional amendments, to federalize the presidential nominating system. Whether Congress has the power to overhaul the presidential nominating system without use of a constitutional amendment has never been fully established. But it is significant, as Ranney has pointed out, that none of the challengers to the constitutionality of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1974 argued that Congress lacked the power to regulate presidential primaries. 13


NOTES
1.
For a discussion of the Packwood plan, see U.S. Congress, Senate, Congressional Record, 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., 1972, 118, pt. 12, pp. 15231-15242.
2.
"Presidential Primaries: Proposals for a New System," Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report 30, ( July 10, 1972): 1653-1654.
4.
See Openness, Participation, and Party Building: Reforms for a Stronger Democratic Party, Report of the Commission on Presidential Nomination and Party Structure ( Winograd Commission) ( Washington, D.C.: Democratic National Committee, 1978), pp. 33-35.

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Presidential Primaries and the Caucus-Convention System: A Sourcebook
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.