U.S. Presidential Primaries and the Caucus-Convention System: A Sourcebook

By James W. Davis | Go to book overview

Glossary
at-large delegates. Delegates to the national convention awarded by the national party as bonuses and incentives to the state parties.
bonus delegates. Extra (bonus) delegates awarded to states that have carried their party ticket for the presidential, congressional, or gubernatorial elections.
caucus: A public or private meeting of party leaders and members to pick or nominate candidates for public office.
Charter Commission (Sanford Commission). Chaired by former North Carolina Governor Terry Sanford, the Democratic Charter Commission was given the task of institutionalizing the party structure and creating a new party charter after the 1972 Democratic National Convention.
closed primary. In-state party primaries to nominate candidates for president and to select national convention delegates and state officeholders; participation in the closed primary is restricted to registered party voters.
Compliance Review Commission. An outgrowth of a continuing dispute between members of the Mikulski Commission ( 1973- 1974) and party regulars on the Democratic National Committee, established to monitor state party conformance with newly enacted party rules governing the national convention delegates selection process.
Congressional Caucus--"King Caucus." First used in 1800, the Congressional Caucus served as the original nominating institution for presidential candidates before the rise of the national nominating convention. Membership consisted of all members belonging to the party in the House and Senate.
Delegates and Organizations (DO) Committee. Established in June 1969 in response to a directive from the 1968 Republican National Convention, "to study and review" party organization and procedures, but had no authority to change party rules.

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