The Arts and Critical Thinking in American Education

By Ivan Olson; Ralph A. Smith | Go to book overview

Introduction

This text combines an amalgam of philosophical reflection with active empirical studies, as well as eighteenth- and nineteenth-century formalism. Also included are discussions of theory of illumination, retinal reception, and cognitive color theories. Many topics, diverse in themselves, have been brought together to offer a resource for discussion and investigation in the areas of learning processes, teaching, and creativity.

The text takes the reader from an overview of some of the foundational work relating to philosophy, critical thinking, aesthetic processes, "awareness," and the mind, through several chapters which will continuously define or redefine critical thinking, creativity, and cultural literacy. Chapter one will present what I believe to be a necessary philosophical overview. In it the reader will find an emphasis on the foundational work of some of the great idealist and realist thinkers as it has influenced our attitudes and approaches to arts experiences, as well as experiences in the other areas of life experiences. Chapter two emphasizes perception and cognition as an important combination, almost inseparable in the three levels of arts activities: creating, presenting, and receiving. Chapters three and four delve deeply into material which is often overlooked in arts or aesthetics issues. I am hopeful that the reader will find helpful resource material here in the discussion of the human developmental processes, art and absorption, the psyche, and defining creativity, all of this brought together under the umbrella of critical thinking. In chapter four, particularly, I present one of the least known cognitive areas of study and issues: imagery. I am convinced that this is a most important area -- recent literature shows that many others now agree with me -- and certainly needs and deserves continuous exploration. Chapter five returns to an overview approach, not as that found in the first chapter, but now as an attempt to relate our ideas, experiments, data, conclusions, and reflections

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Arts and Critical Thinking in American Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Theoretical and Philosophical Overview 1
  • 2 - Perceptual Style 13
  • 3 - Cognition and the Arts: Some Necessary Generalizations 25
  • 4 - The Image is Everything 43
  • 5 - Arts, Aesthetics, and the Umbrella of Critical Thinking 65
  • 6 - Teaching Approaches 97
  • Appendix - A Taxonomy for the Aesthetic Transaction 107
  • Selected Bibliography 131
  • Index 139
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 142

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.