The Critical Press and the New Deal: The Press Versus Presidential Power, 1933-1938

By Gary Dean Best | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
A Bitter Divorce

CONFRONTING A NEW DEPRESSION

Concerns about the implications of New Deal policy for the prospects of recovery had come to occupy much press comment on the Roosevelt administration by the end of 1934, particularly as a result of the unexpected slide of the economy late in the year. The conviction was near universal among newspapermen that the New Deal was retarding recovery. For a minority of them, represented by Mark Sullivan, the suspicion was growing that the delay in recovery represented a conscious policy on the part of some of those within the New Deal who were intent on using the depression as justification for widespread social reforms. The majority, however, clearly regarded it as the result of incompetence rather than design, and assumed, as 1934 ended and 1935 dawned, that the experience of 1934 would usher a new realism into the policies of the administration, and that business recovery would now take priority over reform, as critics as diverse as John Maynard Keynes, businessmen, Republicans, many Democrats, and even the press, itself, were urging.

For Walter Lippmann, Roosevelt's 1935 state of the union address to Congress marked "an important change of emphasis and direction." It signified a move away from the regimentation of the NRA and AAA and toward an emphasis on the responsibility of the federal government to, instead, "supplement and correct, to stimulate and balance the operation of private enterprise." 1 Of the budget presented by the president a few days later, Lippmann wrote: "Since the balancing of the budget is made dependent upon the revival of business, it becomes the duty of the government to reject policies which obstruct revival and to adopt policies which promote it. . . . It involves the abandonment of merely punitive

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Critical Press and the New Deal: The Press Versus Presidential Power, 1933-1938
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 199

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.