The Critical Press and the New Deal: The Press Versus Presidential Power, 1933-1938

By Gary Dean Best | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
A Shoulder to Lean On

IGNORANCE AND SPITE

Despite the depressed economic situation, there seemed early in 1938 little evidence that the Roosevelt administration had altered its basic animus toward the only vehicle for economic recovery that existed: American business. The press, too, now came in for what David Lawrence called "scathing denunciation." Judging from the Roosevelt administration's attitude, the press was guilty of failing "to tell the people that 'prosperity is just around the corner,'" and was "thinking up new ways of 'spreading fear.'" Lawrence wrote that "we are asked to believe, in effect, that the ' Roosevelt depression' is just a fable and a myth of their [the press] creation." The Ickes and Jackson speeches, Lawrence wrote, "draw an indictment so broad and so ridiculous that the intelligent business man who wants to cooperate with the Administration finds himself inclined to stand apart waiting for Reason to be restored inside the government of the United States." It seemed apparent to Lawrence that Roosevelt was "determined to drive ahead with his reform policies," with a "strong selling campaign to convince the people that big bankers and industrialists planned this depression to wreck the reforms for which the people voted." In this way they hoped "to build up a backfire that will react favorably on Congress." 1 Eleanor Patterson, publisher of the Washington Herald-Times, addressed a front-page open letter to Roosevelt in which she told him: "You said once, with eternal truth, that the only thing to fear is fear itself. Fear is depressing industry. With due respect, you should concede the obvious: This fear is fear of you."2

Arthur Krock found that "the adoption by Messrs. Jackson and Ickes of the methods of the Fat Boy in Pickwick has failed in its larger design." The speakers,

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Critical Press and the New Deal: The Press Versus Presidential Power, 1933-1938
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 199

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.