The Preparation of Teachers: An Unstudied Problem in Education

By Seymour B. Sarason | Go to book overview

1
Statement of the Problem

It would take a book of formidable size to present a comprehensive picture of what has taken place in and around our educational system over the last decade or so. We say "in and around our educational system," because it has become clearer than ever before (perhaps because it is truer now than before) that events and conditions outside physical boundaries of the school profoundly affect the processes, goals, and quality of education. We refer here to more than just the influences of sputniks and the space age on education -- profound influences, to be sure, but far from being the only ones. Unprecedented population shifts (south to north, east to west, etc.), predicted but still startling population increases, the influx of various emigré groups (Puerto Rican, Cuban, Mexican), the eruption of the civil rights issue into the national consciousness -- these and other developments have had no less an effect than sputniks and astronauts on what takes place in our schools.

In this book we shall be concerned with an aspect of an educational problem, the importance of which is denied by

-1-

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The Preparation of Teachers: An Unstudied Problem in Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xv
  • 1 - Statement Of The Problem 1
  • 2 - The Current Controversy 17
  • 3 - A Classroom Day 39
  • 4 - The Teacher As Observer: A Description of An Observational Seminar 75
  • 5 - Implications And Recommendations 97
  • 6 - Some Final Comments 117
  • References 123
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