Encyclopedia of American Parties, Campaigns, and Elections

By William C. Binning; Larry E. Esterly et al. | Go to book overview

Q

QUAYLE, J. DAN(FORTH) ( 1947-) served as vice-president of the United States under President George Bush from 1988 to 1991. Dan Quayle was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on February 4, 1947. His father, Jim Quayle, was the publisher of the Huntington Herald Press. Corinne Pulliam, his mother, was the daughter of Eugene C. Pulliam, the wealthy owner of the Central Newspapers located in Indiana and Arizona.

Dan Quayle graduated from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana in 1969, with an A.B. degree in political science. After graduation, he joined the Indiana National Guard, bypassing normal procedures. Quayle's enlistment in the Indiana National Guard became an issue in the 1988 presidential election. It appeared that family influence was exerted so that Quayle could avoid the draft during the Vietnam War.

In 1974, Dan Quayle graduated from Indiana University Law School. He married one of his classmates, Marilyn Tucker, and they practiced law together. He also joined the family-owned business, the Huntington Herald Press in 1974. In 1976, Republican Party leaders asked him to run as the Republican candidate for Congress in the Fourth Congressional District against eight-term incumbent J. Edward Roush. Quayle's candidacy appeared to be a hopeless cause. Quayle won a surprising upset, and in 1978 he was reelected. In 1980 the Republicans once again called on him to run against an incumbent. This time Quayle would challenge Indiana Senator Birch Bayh. Qualye won this election with 54% of the vote. The Reagan landslide in Indiana contributed to Quayle's victory. In 1986, Quayle was reelected to the Senate with 61% of the vote.

As a senator, Quayle was practical and pragmatic. His most noted piece of legislation was the Job Training and Partnership Act of 1982. The bill was

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Encyclopedia of American Parties, Campaigns, and Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 35
  • D 71
  • E 91
  • F 167
  • G 185
  • H 201
  • I 219
  • J 227
  • K 243
  • L 249
  • M 265
  • N 287
  • O 299
  • P 303
  • Q 347
  • R 349
  • S 373
  • T 399
  • U 423
  • V 427
  • W 435
  • Y 449
  • Appendix - Presidents, Vice-Presidents, and Party Control of Congress, 1789-Present 451
  • Selected Bibliography 455
  • Index 459
  • About the Authors *
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