Encyclopedia of American Parties, Campaigns, and Elections

By William C. Binning; Larry E. Esterly et al. | Go to book overview

U

UNDECIDED refers to a group of respondents to a poll who say they have not made up their minds about which candidate will receive their vote. The number of undecided respondents decreases as election day draws closer. Some public opinion experts predict that the undecided will break against the incumbent. In the last two presidential elections, a large proportion of the undecided went for Perot. Some public opinion experts argue that the late undecided vote will vote against the incumbent. This unexpected voting behavior by undecided voters has led to a number of inaccurate predictions by public pollsters.

National polling firms often ask the undecided a series of questions to determine which way the respondents are leaning. The frequently cited Gallup/CNN/ USA Today poll has not been exact in predicting the results of recent presidential elections because of the way it has distributed the undecided. In 1996 the Reuters/ Zogby poll was the most accurate, actually predicting the percentages the candidates received. See:POLL.

References: Rhodes Cook, "Clinton's Easy Second-Term Win Riddles GOP Electoral Map", Congressional Quarterly, Vol. 54 ( November 9, 1996); Michael W. Traugott and Paul J. Lavrakas, The Voter's Guide to Election Polls (Chatham, N.J.: Chatham House, 1996).

UNION PARTY. The Union Party was the name adopted by the Republican Party for the election of 1864. President Lincoln was seeking Democratic support in this election during the Civil War.

There was also a Union Party in the 1936 election. It was a minor party promoted by the controversial radio priest, Father Charles E. Caughlin. The Union Party's presidential candidate in 1939 was North Dakota congressman

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Encyclopedia of American Parties, Campaigns, and Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 35
  • D 71
  • E 91
  • F 167
  • G 185
  • H 201
  • I 219
  • J 227
  • K 243
  • L 249
  • M 265
  • N 287
  • O 299
  • P 303
  • Q 347
  • R 349
  • S 373
  • T 399
  • U 423
  • V 427
  • W 435
  • Y 449
  • Appendix - Presidents, Vice-Presidents, and Party Control of Congress, 1789-Present 451
  • Selected Bibliography 455
  • Index 459
  • About the Authors *
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