Capital Punishment in the United States: A Documentary History

By Bryan Vila ; Cynthia Morris | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
U.S. Executions: Colonial Times to 1995
Year Executions Year Executions Year Executions
1600-1699 162 1946 131 1971 0
1700-1799 1,391 1947 153 1972 0
1800-1865 2,453 1948 119 1973 0
1866-1879 825 1949 119 1974 0
1880-1889 1,005 1950 82 1975 0
1890-1899 1,098 1951 105 1976 0
1900-1909 1,280 1952 83 1977 1
1910-1919 1,091 1953 62 1978 0
1920-1929 1,289 1954 81 1979 2
1930 155 1955 76 1980 0
1931 153 1956 65 1981 1
1932 140 1957 65 1982 2
1933 160 1958 49 1983 5
1934 168 1959 49 1984 21
1935 199 1960 56 1985 18
1936 195 1961 42 1986 18
1937 147 1962 47 1987 25
1938 190 1963 21 1988 11
1939 160 1964 15 1989 16
1940 124 1965 7 1990 23
1941 123 1966 1 1991 14
1942 147 1967 2 1992 31
1943 131 1968 0 1993 38
1944 120 1969 0 1994 31
1945 117 1970 0 1995 56
Total 14,766
Source: 1600-1930, Schneider and Smykla 1991:6 (but note that data prior to 1930 may not be
complete); 1930-1993, Maguire and Pastore 1995:Table 6.82; 1994, Stephan and Snell 1996; 1995,
Associated Press, December 29, 1995.

-309-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Capital Punishment in the United States: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents xi
  • Series Foreword xix
  • Preface xxi
  • Introduction xxv
  • Note xxxv
  • Significant Dates in the History of Capital Punishment xxxvii
  • Part I - Early Views on Capital Punishment: Colonial Era to Independence 1
  • Note 12
  • Part II - The Abolition Movement Gains Ground, 1800-1917 31
  • Note 37
  • Note 52
  • Note 66
  • Part III - War and Economic Depression Overshadow Capital Punishment, 1918-1959 75
  • Note 90
  • Note 102
  • Part IV - Capital Punishment in the Courts, 1960-1976 109
  • Note 128
  • Note 141
  • Note 152
  • Note 157
  • Note 162
  • Part V - The Debate Begins Anew, 1977-1989 169
  • Note 178
  • Note 181
  • Note 186
  • Note 190
  • Note 192
  • Note 208
  • Note 231
  • Part VI - The Death Penalty in the 1990s: Contemporary Issues 247
  • Note 287
  • Note 289
  • Glossary 301
  • Appendix A - Federal and State Capital Offenses in the United States 303
  • Appendix B - U.S. Executions: Colonial Times to 1995 309
  • Appendix C - Selected U.S. Supreme Court Cases 311
  • Appendix D - Capital Punishment Interest Groups and Related Organizations 313
  • Select Bibliography 315
  • Index 327
  • About the Editors *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 337

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.