Capital Punishment in the United States: A Documentary History

By Bryan Vila ; Cynthia Morris | Go to book overview

Select Bibliography

GENERAL WORKS

Acker James R. "A Different Agenda: The Supreme Court, Empirical Research Evidence, and Capital Punishment Decisions, 1986-1989". Law and Society Review 27, no. 1 ( 1993): 65-88.

American College of Physicians, Human Rights Watch, The National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, Physicians for Human Rights. Breach of Trust: Physician Participation in Executions in the United States, 1994.

Amsterdam Anthony. "In Favorem Mortis: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment". Human Rights 14, no. 1 ( 1987).

Archer Dane, and Rosemary Gartner. Violence and Crime in Cross-National Perspective. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1984.

Associated Press, February 8, 1924. "Gas Kills Convict Almost Instantly". In New York Times, February 9, 1924, 15.

-----, January 17, 1977. "A Partial Transcript of Remarks by Witness to Gilmore Execution". In New York Times, January 18, 1977, 4.

-----, December 29, 1995. "56 Executions This Year Are Most Since 1957". In New York Times, December 30, 1995, 28.

Bailey William C. "Murder, Capital Punishment, and Television: Execution Publicity and Homicide Rates". American Sociological Review 55 ( October 1990).

Baldus David C., and James W. L. Cole. "The Illusion of Deterrence in Isaac Ehrlich's Research on Capital Punishment". Yale Law Journal 85 ( 1975).

Baldus David C., Charles Pulaski, and George Woodworth. "Comparative Review of Death Sentences: An Empirical Study of the Georgia Experience". Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology 74 ( 1983).

Baldus David, George Woodworth, and Charles A. Pulaski, Jr. Equal Justice and the Death Penalty: A Legal and Empirical Analysis. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1990.

Barbash Fred. "Justice Powell Urges End to Death Sentence Delaying". Washington Post, May 10, 1983.

-315-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Capital Punishment in the United States: A Documentary History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 337

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.