Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary

By Carole Levin; Debra Barrett-Graves et al. | Go to book overview

MARGHERITA DATINI
(ca. 1360-1423)

Italy
Merchant's Wife

In the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, women were supposed to marry and provide their husbands with heirs. In their marriages they were expected to be silent and obedient. The model that was told to women was to obey whether the request was reasonable or unreasonable, something that could be accomplished or was utterly futile. Many women, except those at the top of the social scale and those in nunneries, were illiterate. Most of all, wives were expected not to demand equality with their husbands. Although Margherita di Domenico Bandini was only sixteen when she married the Italian merchant Francesco Datini in 1376, and he was over forty, in this marriage Margherita demonstrated courage and compassion and an insistence on equality rare for her time period. Over a hundred of her letters to him have survived, which give a rare glimpse into the marriage of an extraordinary woman.

Margherita's new husband had built up a thriving career as a merchant. Although they were both from Italy, they married in Avignon, where Francesco had been engaged in trade for many years, since that was in the fourteenth century the seat of the papacy. Francesco's family had been pressuring him for years to marry and had feared because of his traveling he would not marry a hometown girl. They were delighted when he settled on Margherita, even though she was an orphan and did not bring her husband a dowry; she was, however, young, attractive, and on her mother's side connected with Florentine nobility, making her a good catch for a merchant.

Soon after the marriage, the Pope left Avignon to return to Rome; soon Francesco Datini and Margherita returned to Tuscany. As a merchant, Francesco traveled frequently. When he was away, he would write at least twice a week to Margherita. Even though Margherita was young and wives at the time were told to be silent and obedient, Margherita was frequently outspoken in her responses.

-60-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 327

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.