Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary

By Carole Levin; Debra Barrett-Graves et al. | Go to book overview

VERONICA FRANCO
(1546-1591)

Italy
Poet and Courtesan

Veronica Franco was a poet and citizen of Venice and one of that city's most famous cortegiane oneste, or honored courtesans, a distinction given to higher-class courtesans known for their intellectual gifts, wit, and fashionable appearances. The cortegiane oneste enjoyed a unique status apart both from the lower-class prostitutes and from the married women of Venice's upper class who were generally confined to private, domestic lives.

Although Franco and her three brothers were not born into the Venetian nobility, they did belong to a respectable class of merchants and professional men. When Veronica was young she was married to Paola Panizza, a physician; although the reasons are not known, they soon separated. Franco and Panizza did not have any children together, but Franco later had six children, three of whom died in infancy. The father of one of her children was Andrea Thon, a prominent Venetian nobleman.

Although marriage was considered the more socially and economically prudent choice for women, Franco remained single for the rest of her life, supporting herself and her children through her own career as a courtesan. Venice had a particularly high number of courtesans; this may have been due to the fact that the city was a crossroads for a variety of foreign travelers or because of the custom of relatively late marriages among Venetian upper-class men. Scholars have also suggested that the government may have condoned the cortegiane oneste because of the tax revenues they produced. The city's attitude toward this class of women, however, was generally ambiguous; Venice both boasted and lamented the cortegiane oneste, who were said to rival the upper-class matrons in their sumptuous wardrobes and surpass them in their conversational gifts. It was apparently Franco's mother who introduced her to the profession, for by the time Franco was twenty, she and her mother were both among the

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 327

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.