Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary

By Carole Levin; Debra Barrett-Graves et al. | Go to book overview

MARGARET OF ANJOU
(ca. 1430-1482)

France
Queen Consort

Margaret of Anjou was a powerful queen who, in fighting to protect the interests of her husband and son of the house of Lancaster, lost them both but gained a reputation for both bravery and ruthlessness. Margaret was born about 1430 during the Hundred Years War between England and France. Earlier in the century English war efforts had been highly successful. The king of France, Charles VI, had periodic bouts of insanity, and the government was chaotic. Henry V of England, of the royal house of Lancaster, was a strong military leader who resumed the war. His triumph at Agincourt in 1415 had led eventually to the French signing the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. By the treaty, Henry married Charles VI's daughter Katherine, ruled as regent, and would be king after Charles's death. Charles's son, Charles the Dauphin, was disinherited. But Henry, strong and vigorous as he seemed, died only two years later, a few months before Charles VI. Henry and Katherine's son, Henry VI, at nine months, became King of France and England. Henry V's brothers fought among themselves as they tried to rule England and France for the infant king, while the Dauphin held court in exile at Bourges. During the 1430s the English allied themselves with the Burgundians, rivals of the Dauphin Charles's party. Around the time of Margaret's birth, the young peasant girl Joan of Arc, hearing the voices of the saints, persuaded the Dauphin to give her an army that relieved the siege at Orleans and then led Charles to Rheims to be crowned Charles VII, thus turning the tide of the war.

Margaret was the fourth surviving child of René of Anjou and Isabelle of Lorraine. René was the great-grandson of the French king John the Good, and his sister Mary was the wife of Charles VII, so Margaret was both cousin to the king and his niece by marriage. When Margaret was five she was sent to live with her paternal grand

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 327

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.