Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary

By Carole Levin; Debra Barrett-Graves et al. | Go to book overview

CARITAS PIRCKHEIMER
(1467-1532)

Germany
Abbess, Defender of Her Faith, and Humanist
Scholar

In the early years of the Reformation, Caritas (or Charitas) Pirckheimer, German abbess of the convent of Saint Clare in Nuremberg, courageously resisted efforts by city officials, religious leaders, and citizens with Protestant sympathies to close her convent. She used her reputation as a pious and exceptionally learned woman to defend the religious beliefs and practices of her Catholic community. In doing so, Caritas deployed her impressive humanist training in a more public way than European humanist teachers or writers, almost all of them men, considered appropriate for women.

As an intellectual movement, humanism looked to classical Greece and Rome, particularly its philosophy and literature, as models for contemporary Europe, and it emphasized the study of classical writings as the best means to produce educated, virtuous men for service to the state. Hence, many debated the value of such intellectual training for women, who were barred from nearly, all public offices or careers because of their sex. Yet some, including perhaps Caritas's father, felt that humanist studies were appropriate for women, because they furthered personal virtue, even if women had little practical outlet for their studies. Caritas Pirckheimer, however, did put her learning to public use as she defended her institution from its earliest opponents and left a remarkable written history of that crisis.

Caritas was born in 1467 into an affluent and powerful Bavarian family with a commitment to humanist learning, for both daughters and sons received an impressive education. Her father, Johannes Pirckheimer, served as legal advisor to the Nuremberg city council. The oldest child, Caritas entered the convent of Saint Clare at age twelve. The convent was highly regarded throughout Germany for both its learning and piety; a wealthy institution, it boasted an im

-232-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 327

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.