Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary

By Carole Levin; Debra Barrett-Graves et al. | Go to book overview

CATERINA SFORZA
(1462-1509)

Italy
Territorial Ruler

Although the circumstances of her birth were far from glorious, Caterina Sforza became one of the most powerful women in fifteenthcentury Italy. She was born in 1462, the illegitimate daughter of the powerful Galeazzo Maria Sforza, the second Sforza Duke of Milan. At the time of her birth, however, her father was not yet the duke; he was a lively prince of eighteen who had become enamored with Lucrezia Landriani, the wife of a close friend; Lucrezia would eventually bear Galeazzo three other children in addition to Caterina.

When Caterina was four her father became Duke of Milan. He assumed responsibility for his children; their illegitimacy did not prevent him from providing them with an aristocratic upbringing. At age ten, Caterina was betrothed to Girolamo Riaro, a man of simple origins who rose to immense power as the nephew of Pope Sixtus IV. Galeazzo intended the marriage to secure an alliance between his family in Milan and the papacy in Rome. Girolamo came to Milan to confirm the betrothal with magnificent gifts for his future bride; he then returned to Rome, leaving Caterina behind to mature and continue her education. For the next few years, Girolamo increased his political power in Rome and gained control over Imola, a small but politically and strategically important town in the Romagna area of northeast Italy.

Plans for Caterina's future were accelerated in 1476 when her father was brutally assassinated by political enemies. In order to preserve the planned alliance between Milan and Rome, Caterina was hastily married to Girolamo; she was just fourteen. In 1478, their first child was born; Caterina would eventually give birth to nine children. She grew up quickly from a shy young girl to a beautiful, confident wife and mother. One of her favorite pastimes was hunting; she owned several beloved hunting dogs and horses. She also had an avid interest in collecting and experimenting with recipes for cosmetics

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 327

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.