The New American Painting: As Shown in Eight European Countries, 1958-1959

By Museum of Modern Art | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

The International Program of the Museum of Modern Art was established in 1952. Since then it has sent to all parts of the world fifty exhibitions of painting and sculpture, prints, architecture and design, photography and the film. This is the first full-scale exhibition prepared for circulation outside the United States which we have been able to show in the Museum itself.

The New American Painting was organized at the request of European institutions for a show devoted specifically to Abstract Expressionism in America. Most of the artists have been shown in the Museum, but even in New York we have not until now undertaken so comprehensive a survey. Although works by many of them were previously known in Europe, often from exhibitions circulated by the International Program, the few quotations on pages 7-14 give only a slight idea of Europe's present interest in American art, stimulated by this exhibition. Concrete evidence may be found in the increasing number of purchases for public and private collections in Europe.

We must express our gratitude to many: to those individuals and organizations in the United States and Europe whose interest and assistance brought the exhibition into being; to the institutions where it was shown; to our generous and patient lenders; to the United States Lines, which transported the paintings to and from Europe without charge.

We are grateful to the International Council at the Museum of Modern Art for enabling the International Program to carry out this project, and we are indebted to the staff of the Program and particularly to its Director, Porter A. McCray, for the meticulous care with which the exhibition has been organized and presented in each of the eight European countries to which it has travelled. First and last, The New American Painting demonstrates the knowledge and experience of its director, Dorothy C. Miller. Her insight and that of Alfred H. Barr, Jr., who provided the introduction to this catalogue, are evident in many of the exhibitions at the Museum and in the acquisition of works of art for the Museum Collection.

For us, our reward is the pleasure of knowing that this exhibition and those before it have won for American art widespread recognition and acclaim abroad.

RENE D'HARNONCOURT
Director
The Museum of Modern Art

-5-

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The New American Painting: As Shown in Eight European Countries, 1958-1959
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • The International Council at the Museum of Modern Art 3
  • Foreword 5
  • Acknowledgment 6
  • As the Critics Saw It 7
  • Introduction 15
  • Catalogue 88
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